Tags: China-Russia | Pact | Worries | U.S.

China-Russia Pact Worries U.S.

Tuesday, 01 May 2001 12:00 AM

Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs James Kelly was referring to the cooperative accord, including closer military cooperation, which the two nations were reported by the Tass news agency to be close to signing. Kelly said, "I see that as a relationship that is important and worth watching, which is troubling to some extent but probably has some inherent limits on how far it is going to go."

Speaking before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee about Sino-Russian relations, Kelly told lawmakers that "China apparently is interested in access to military technology that the former Soviet Union developed and the Russian federation now possesses."

That military technology consists of airplanes, naval missiles and ballistic missiles, he said. This kind of "military cooperation is not in our interest and not to our liking."

In November, China signed an agreement with the United States pledging to develop a weapons export control regime and discontinue certain advanced weapons sales to countries not a party to missile control agreements. However, there has been little progress on this agreement since it was signed, according to State Department officials.

Kelly, who handled the East Asia and Pacific portfolio in the Pentagon and the National Security Council under President Reagan, will now be responsible for U.S. diplomatic relations with China in a State Department in which Secretary of State Colin Powell has pledged to delegate more responsibilities to his deputies.

In his testimony Tuesday, Kelly said the fundamental relationship with China had changed since the country detained the crew of the EP-3 Navy plane for 11 days last month.

"We are not interested in a war of words in response to China's very vocal criticism," he said in reference to Beijing's comments on President Bush's recent statement that the U.S. would do "whatever it takes" to defend Taiwan.

"But we're not going to conduct business as usual after our servicemen and women were detained for 11 days in China. Beijing needs to understand that."

Kelly claimed to senators Tuesday that China maintained a friendly status with the United States.

"I would say China is a kind of a friend, I would certainly agree that China is not a kind of enemy. And I would also say it was not one of our allies. Friend is a term in English that has a lot of different meanings, and you can have some very stiff disagreements with friends so I would like to categorize the goal is to have this kind of friendship," Kelly explained.

Kelly said the countries could cooperate on environmental issues, law enforcement - particularly on drug trafficking - arms proliferation and the global AIDS crisis.

But Kelly also said the United States would be tough on a number of issues as well. To start, he highlighted China's abuse of Tibetan Buddhists as an area that would factor into U.S. diplomacy with China.

"We will continue to focus on Tibet. We are pressing the Chinese government at all levels to end the abuses, including use of torture, arbitrary arrest, detention without public trial or detention for peaceful expression of political or religious views," he said.

Copyright 2001 by United Press International.

All rights reserved.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs James Kelly was referring to the cooperative accord, including closer military cooperation, which the two nations were reported by the Tass news agency to be close to signing. Kelly said, I see that as a relationship...
China-Russia,Pact,Worries,U.S.
529
2001-00-01
Tuesday, 01 May 2001 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved