Tags: California | Critical | for | Republican | Future

California Critical for Republican Future

Sunday, 10 February 2002 12:00 AM

California voted solidly Democratic for Al Gore in the 2000 presidential election. With other significant electoral states like New York in their back pocket, the Democrats could soon have a lock grip on winning future presidential races.

This weekend, state Republicans gathered in San Jose to help decide the future of the party and to hear the three candidates vying for the Republican mantle.

The California election has garnered national importance because of the state's influence on both the national Republican Party and future presidential races.

The front-runner in the hotly contested Republican primary is former Los Angeles mayor Richard Riordan, who is challenged by conservatives William Simon Jr. and Secretary of State Bill Jones.

The word from the San Jose convention is that Republican delegates had little sympathy for Riordan, despite his unlimited campaign war chest (he's reputed to be worth $500 million) and his bevy of endorsements from congressional Republicans and the explicit support of the Bush White House.

During a testy debate before the convention, Bill Simon explained why Riordan won't work: "We're a party of principle. We don't need to nominate someone just because the chattering elite say he can win."

Riordan's supporters claim that the state's demographics have changed and the party must become more "inclusive."

What Riordan means by inclusion is best explained by his record.

Riordan, as it turns out, donated twice to Democratic Governor Gray Davis when he ran and won last time. Riordan has also donated to the campaign of liberal Democrat congresswoman Maxine Waters.

As mayor, Republican Riordan promised a bipartisan administration in Los Angeles, but with few exceptions his entire city administration was staffed by liberal Democrats.

Riordan has been compared with liberal New York Republican Rudy Giuliani. But almost all of Giuliani's appointees were Republicans.

And Riordan has nowhere near the record Giuliani earned on reducing crime. In fact, the Los Angeles police officers association is not endorsing Riordan.

Riordan makes no bones of his intent if elected. The New York Times' Page One story profiling Riordan headlined: "Hoping to Run California, And Recast the Republicans."

Riordan told the Times "he is trying not just to win but also to refashion the Republican Party's traditional conservative ideology by steering it leftward."

So, it should be clear what "inclusion" means: adopting liberal Democratic programs, ideas and candidates. If this is the Republican agenda, why have a Republican Party?

Let's put it another way. When was the last time you heard of the Democrats pushing a Democrat candidate who endorsed, appointed and supported Republicans?

Never, because Democrats play politics smart.

If Riordan wins in November, you can bet the left-wing media won't stop repeating that the Riordan election "proves" Republicans have to discard their values if they ever want to win.

Contrary to the media spin, Republicans

Sure, demographics have changed here.

But those demographics include a large influx of Asians – who have fit well with Republican values of strong families and less government.

Even the burgeoning Latin community has been voting increasingly for Republicans – and will continue to do so if it is shown a clear difference between the two parties.

If Riordan wins the primary, he will likely lose in November.

This past week I met with one of the state's most influential elected Republicans.

He told me most Republicans say that if Riordan wins the primary many Republicans won't vote and some may even vote for Davis.

Davis, meanwhile, has taken the unusual and extraordinary step of launching a withering assault of negative TV ads against Riordan – months before the general election and before Riordan has even won the primary.

Why?

Some Republicans believe the Davis camp realizes that Riordan will be their best opponent. By attacking him now, they hope to energize Davis supporters now so they get to the polls on March 5 to vote for him.

Davis, a centrist Democrat, knows he'll win in a cakewalk against a Republican who endorses, donates and supports Democrats.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
California voted solidly Democratic for Al Gore in the 2000 presidential election. With other significant electoral states like New York in their back pocket, the Democrats could soon have a lock grip on winning future presidential races. This weekend, state Republicans...
California,Critical,for,Republican,Future
664
2002-00-10
Sunday, 10 February 2002 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved