Tags: Bishops | Oppose | Kerry

Bishops Oppose Kerry

Tuesday, 12 October 2004 12:00 AM

Senator Kerry, he reminded them, despite his front-and-center Catholicism, has been a consistent proponent of abortion, and so what about his potential influence upon the Supreme Court?

"Supreme Court cases can be overturned, right?" he asked. And so why not Roe v. Wade? But it won't happen with Kerry. It may happen with President Bush.

In a separate private interview in his residence, Archbishop Chaput said a vote for a candidate who supports abortion rights or embryonic stem cell research would be a sin that must be confessed before receiving Communion.

"If you vote this way, are you cooperating in evil?" he asked. "And if you know you are cooperating in evil, should you go to confession? The answer is yes."

Archbishop Chaput didn't out-and-out endorse either candidate. His point is that responsible citizens, responsible Christians, look at these issues, see where the candidates truly stand on them and then vote their consciences, vote for the man of principle, not slick promises.

The Times notes that the Bush campaign is attempting to tap into this return to the basics.

"The efforts of Archbishop Chaput and his allies are converging with a concerted drive for conservative Catholic voters by the Bush campaign. It has spent four years cultivating Catholic leaders, organizing more than 50,000 volunteers and hiring a corps of paid staff members to increase Catholic turnout. The campaign is pushing to break the traditional allegiance of Catholic voters to the Democratic Party, an affiliation that began to crumble with Ronald Reagan 24 years ago."

Not a bad idea. "Catholics make up about a quarter of the electorate, and many conservative Catholics are concentrated in swing states, pollsters say."

Other Catholic bishops are on the same page. Archbishop Raymond L. Burke of St. Louis issued a similar statement two weeks ago, while Bishop Michael J. Sheridan of Colorado Springs and Archbishop John J. Myers of Newark both have noted recently that the obligation to oppose abortion outweighs every other issue.

In the presidential debate last Friday, Mr. Kerry smooth-talked his way around the contradiction of his faith (his rhetoric) and his works (his 20-year voting record) in the Senate.

Asked whether or not he would force Christians who oppose abortion to pay for them, Senator Kerry pathetically attempted to recapture the moral high ground by reminding America that he was once "an alter boy. ... But I can't take what is an article of faith for me and legislate it for someone who doesn't share that article of faith, whether they be agnostic, atheist, Jew, Protestant, whatever."

He feigned sincerity. But if we want to think about, rather than be touched or dazzled by, Kerry's response, we find that the man did not recapture the moral high ground at all but managed only to re-establish his contradictory moral low ground.

For what he really said was that he will permit the agnostic, the atheist, the irresponsibly pregnant to impose their beliefs on everyone else by forcing them to pay for their choices, their misjudgments, their lack of self-control, or the natural results of their actions via taxpayer-funded abortions, or via insurance regulations and court decisions that apply real pressure to private health care providers to provide abortions.

Isn't that, in substance, not rhetoric, what he really said? Indeed it is.

Thus, either way, force is applied. Either way, the religious freedoms of those who oppose abortion are violated. Either way, Mr. Kerry proves once again that he wants to have it both ways on every issue, without exception.

And so, maybe the Catholic bishops are right. Maybe it's time their members consider the fundamental moral issues at stake before casting a vote. It might help them providentially see right through slick and shallow campaigns like Kerry-Edwards, and save a nation.

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Senator Kerry, he reminded them, despite his front-and-center Catholicism, has been a consistent proponent of abortion, and so what about his potential influence upon the Supreme Court? "Supreme Court cases can be overturned, right?" he asked. And so why not Roe v. Wade?...
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Tuesday, 12 October 2004 12:00 AM
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