Tags: Analysis: | Bolton | Will | Accepted | U.N.

Analysis: Bolton Will Be Accepted by U.N.

Monday, 01 August 2005 12:00 AM

"He is the choice of the President and I will work with him," explained U.N. chief Kofi Annan as he reacted to President George W. Bush's recess appointment of John Bolton as the new U.S. ambassador to the international body.

Annan's reaction was typical of the U.N. diplomatic corps.

At the world body, a diplomat's importance is often gauged by their access to key decision makers. In his case, Bolton has direct access to the only man in Washington who counts - the President.

Earlier today in Washington, Bush said it all when he told reporters, "John Bolton has my full confidence."

While some on Capitol Hill may seek to impugn Bolton's influence by virtue of the fact he was not approved by the Senate, Madeleine K. Albright, who was approved by the Senate, was disliked by many a U.N. diplomat, including Bourtos-Boutros Ghali.

Albright survived at the U.N. because she had the ear of Bill Clinton.

Bolton will likely be more liked than Albright.

On qualifications, Bolton is one of the most qualified of all U.S.-U.N. ambassadors in the last decade.

Prior to his last State Dept. position as Asst. Secretary of State for Disarmament Affairs, Bolton actually worked for Kofi Annan. In the late 1990's, former secretary of state James Baker worked as Annan's special representative to mediate the civil war in the Western Sahara. John Bolton was Baker's senior deputy on the project.

While at the U.N. Bolton kept a low and distinctively professional profile.

Prior to the Western Sahara appointment, Bolton was the senior U.S. official guiding U.S.-U.N. relations during the administration of George H.W. Bush, which, of course, featured the first Gulf War in 1991.

That tour of duty brought Bolton into repeated clashes with then U.S.-U.N. ambassador Thomas Pickering.

Bolton ended that conflict by recalling Pickering a year before his term at the U.N. was to expire and then reassigning him to India. Not surprisingly, Pickering was one of several former U.S. ambassadors who tried to block Bolton's nomination.

Bolton's most visible assignment was one which had nothing to do with the U.N. or foreign relations and may have clouded the judgement of some Democrats toward him.

In November 2000, it was John Bolton, again working with Jim Baker, who led the Bush campaign's successful challenge to get the Supreme Court to validate the Florida presidential vote and install George W Bush as the nation's 43rd president.

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"He is the choice of the President and I will work with him,"explained U.N. chief Kofi Annan as he reacted to President George W. Bush's recess appointment of John Bolton as the new U.S. ambassador to the international body. Annan's reaction was typical of the U.N....
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Monday, 01 August 2005 12:00 AM
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