Tags: 'The | President's | Assassin': | Greed | Clothed | Terror

'The President's Assassin': Greed Clothed in Terror

Thursday, 17 March 2005 12:00 AM

He's alone, he's in his underwear, he's got $50 million in cash - and a bomb somewhere in his car.

Goodness.

Or so might the witty JAG lawyer-turned-government-pawn say in Brian Haig's newest novel,

From Haig's previous books, we know Sean Drummond as the sarcastic, sharp-tongued, battle-hardened, legal eagle Army Major with a nose for getting himself thrown into situations much more dangerous and complex than they would at first appear.

This time, however, Drummond knows exactly who's in trouble, who's responsible and what the stakes are. Not that it's helping.

Drummond is "on loan" - or perhaps banished - from the Army to the CIA's Office of Special Projects, which means he has many bosses, only one he can trust, and a whole lot of "expendable" written across his forehead.

When the White House Chief of staff is murdered, along with his wife and the entire security detail assigned to him, Drummond is summoned straight from the shower into a Homeland Security nightmare.

The killer's note read, in part, "There will be others. The President will be history in the next two days."

Further investigation of the murder scene propels Drummond into an intense working relationship with the bright, slim, attractive FBI Special Agent Jennie Margold, to whose hip he is attached for the case, and then sends Drummond and Margold on a chase to stop a renegade Secret Service agent.

Haig's writes brilliantly, making us race along with Drummond and Margold in their whirlwind tour by car, plane and helicopter of an amazing, seemingly unstoppable succession of further mayhem and explosive and shocking murders of high-level government officials.

We're baffled when the killers seem uncannily one step ahead of the nation's entire intelligence apparatus.

Our sensibilities are squeezed as we learn about the suspect's abusive and tragic family life.

We're exhausted, excited, on edge and trying to guess what will happen next, just like Sean Drummond and Jennie Margold.

We only get a breather when the two explore each other, and delve into the mind of their suspect, while trying to slog their way through meetings with their superiors.

But the respites belie reality, leading the reader into a false sense of security. We forget that there are only two days for the FBI, CIA et al. to figure out who's after the president, and how to stop them.

Just when you're enjoying the barbs and banter tossed around by the irreverent Drummond and his myriad of superiors - all of whom want to cover their own you-know-whats because the you-know-what has hit the fan – and the building sexual tension between Drummond and agent Margold, BOOM! The killers cause chaos when you least expect it.

Without giving away too much, suffice it to say that in the end, Drummond's willpower will fail him, but common sense will not. He'll also need to use one or two of his old Army contacts, his legal know-how and sheer adrenaline-powered guts to overcome the aim of the assassins.

And get his clothes back.

Brian Haig seemingly doesn't want us to put his books down once we pick them up. A retired Army lieutenant colonel himself – he spent 22 years protecting us from our enemies – having graduated from West Pont, Haig holds a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard, and a Masters in Government from Georgetown University.

He's a full-time novelist now, but Haig is no stranger to the halls of military power. He served three years as the Special Assistant to the Commander-in-Chief of the U.N. Command and Combined Forces Command, the commander of all American and Republic of Korea forces in Korea, and was Special Assistant to the Joint Chiefs for four more years, serving directly under Colin Powell

His first novel, "Secret Sanction," was published in the summer of 2001, and was a national bestseller. His second novel, "Mortal Allies," was released in spring 2002; his third, "The Kingmaker," in January 2003; and his fourth, "Private Sector," in September 2003.

102-102-102

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
He's alone, he's in his underwear, he's got $50 million in cash - and a bomb somewhere in his car. Goodness. Or so might the witty JAG lawyer-turned-government-pawn say in Brian Haig's newest novel, From Haig's previous books, we know Sean Drummond as the...
'The,President's,Assassin':,Greed,Clothed,Terror
665
2005-00-17
Thursday, 17 March 2005 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved