Tags: Donald Trump | Trump Administration | white house | al franken | donald trump | accusations | admitted

WH on Franken, Trump Accusations: Franken 'Admitted Wrongdoing'

Image: WH on Franken, Trump Accusations: Franken 'Admitted Wrongdoing'
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By    |   Friday, 17 November 2017 05:18 PM

The difference between the sexual assault allegations against Sen. Al Franken and those made against President Donald Trump during last year's campaign is that the Minnesota Democrat "has admitted wrongdoing," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Friday.

Sanders responded to a question at the daily briefing about whether it would be "fair" to investigate claims made against Trump by more than a dozen women.

"This was covered pretty extensively during the campaign," Sanders told reporters at the White House. "We addressed that then.

"The American people I think spoke very loud and clear when they elected this president.

"In one case specifically, Sen. Franken has admitted wrongdoing and the president hasn't," she added. "I think that's a very clear distinction."

Los Angeles radio news anchor Leeann Tweeden accused Franken Thursday of groping her during a USO tour of the Middle East in 2006.

She also posted a picture of the assault, which occurred while she was sleeping aboard a cargo plane.

Franken, 66, a former "Saturday Night Live" alum who was first elected to the Senate in 2008, apologized and called for an ethics investigation.

Trump also slammed Franken on Twitter Thursday:

In addition, Sanders beat back questions that Trump was being hypocritical on Franken while remaining silent on the accusations against Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore.

"He did weigh in on Roy Moore," she told reporters. "He did it on a foreign trip to Asia. I did it repeatedly yesterday.

"To say the president hasn't weighed in is inaccurate and wrong," Sanders added. "He weighed in if the allegations are true, he should step aside."

She noted that Trump also supported the Republican National Committee's decision to withdraw financial support from Moore's campaign because of the allegations by as many as nine women.

"That's simply an inaccurate statement to make about the president."

Moore, 70, a former Alabama Supreme Court judge, remained defiant Thursday in rejecting calls from top GOP leaders to quit the Senate race before the Dec. 12 election.

He also slammed Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky for backing only an ethics probe of Franken while arguing he should leave the contest.

Sanders reiterated Friday earlier statements that President Trump believed that the Moore allegations were "extremely troubling"

"He feels like it's up to the governor and the people in the state of Alabama to make a determination on whether or not to delay that election or on whether or not they support or should vote for Roy Moore."

More broadly, Sanders said that the assault allegations against Franken and Moore made for an "uncomfortable conversation for the country" and that "we certainly think that it should be taken very seriously.

"This is something that is being discussed pretty widely," she said. "We certainly think that it should be taken very seriously.

"Obviously, it's something that should be looked at.

"It should be looked at widespread — not just in the political sphere, but in the business atmosphere and across the board in this country," Sanders said. "It's something we certainly again take seriously."

She also took a swipe at Democrat Hillary Clinton, who told Mother Jones that she could not comprehend why the allegations against President Trump did not hurt his chances at the polls in November.

"I don't understand a lot about how he got away with so many attacks and insults and behaviors that allowed him to win the presidency," Clinton told the magazine in an interview published Friday.

"I think part of it is because a lot of people really saw him more as an entertainment figure.

"It's something that people are going to be scratching their heads about a long time," she said.

In response, Sanders said: "I think Hillary Clinton probably should have dealt with some of her own issues before addressing this president."

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The difference between the sexual assault allegations against Sen. Al Franken and those made against President Donald Trump during last year's campaign is that the Minnesota Democrat "has admitted wrongdoing," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said...
white house, al franken, donald trump, accusations, admitted, wrongdoing
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Friday, 17 November 2017 05:18 PM
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