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Trump Warns of 'Traffic' and 'Commercial' Delays at Border

Trump Warns of 'Traffic' and 'Commercial' Delays at Border

Sunday, 07 April 2019 06:36 AM

It’s become a complete mess for trucks hauling goods from Mexico to the U.S., snarling transport at some of the busiest border crossings in the world.

A week of heated threats from Donald Trump to close the border means Mexican companies are rushing to send as much cargo into the U.S. as they can, in case of a shutdown that would limit trade. Meanwhile, as many as 750 U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers were reassigned to border patrol sectors in late March, crimping the staffing needed to allow for the flow of goods from south to north.

As a result, wait times to cross the border have soared and can be as many as 10 hours longer than usual.

Trump said in a tweet there will be traffic and commercial delays “with the large scale surge of illegal migrants trying to make their way into the United States,” adding that “until Mexico cleans up this ridiculous & massive migration, we will be focusing on Border Security, not Ports of Entry.”

With trucks getting stuck at the border, Mexican companies are being forced to pay more to bring in additional vehicles for loading shipments. While the U.S. has yet to see meaningful shortages in goods from Mexico, prices for at least one import -- avocados -- have soared amid worries over a border closure. Buyers of berries, limes and asparagus are making plans to limit potential fallout from such a shutdown.

“The delays have doubled, tripled, quadrupled -- it’s not an exact science,” said Jaime Castaneda, vice president for trade policy at the U.S. Dairy Export Council. Lane closures and weekend shutdowns are adding to delays, he said.

The wait times are especially long in El Paso, Laredo and the San Diego area, said Ben Enriquez, senior vice president of Mexico for Transplace, a logistics service provider. In El Paso, it’s taking as long as 12 hours to cross into the U.S., up from about 1 to 2 hours on a normal day, he said. Usually when one port has congestion problems, trucks can be re-routed to other crossings, but now almost all entry points are confronting similar issues.

“The shippers try to push as much freight as possible and, at the same time, you have fewer officers” from U.S. Customs, Enriquez said. “So, it’s not a good combination.”

The delays are tying up trucks at the border that usually head back south with a load and then are ready to pick up freight again at factories in the interior of Mexico. That’s causing Mexican companies to pay extra to bring in empty trucks to load those goods, he said.

So far, the delays have been primarily for cargoes moving north and aren’t yet impacting southbound shipments of U.S. goods like meat and dairy. Mexico is the top buyer of American pork.

“Obviously, we want the ports of entry running smoothly,” said Joe Schuele, vice president of the U.S. Meat Export Federation.

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It's become a complete mess for trucks hauling goods from Mexico to the U.S., snarling transport at some of the busiest border crossings in the world.A week of heated threats from Donald Trump to close the border means Mexican companies are rushing to send as much cargo...
trump, traffic, commercial, delays, border
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2019-36-07
Sunday, 07 April 2019 06:36 AM
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