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Tags: social security | overpayments | peters | stabenow

Senators Warn of Debt From Social Security Overpayments

By    |   Friday, 01 March 2024 04:23 PM EST

Legislators are sounding the alarm about Social Security overpayments after the administration issued $11 billion in overpayments in fiscal year 2022, causing debt problems for recipients across the country.

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Democrat Sens. Gary Peters and Debbie Stabenow of Michigan wrote to the administration this week, urging officials to put an end to the overpayment problem, which costs the administration over $6 billion each year.

"We have heard from numerous Michiganders regarding the impact unexpected overpayments that were sent by the SSA [Social Security Administration] have caused on some of the most vulnerable beneficiaries of Social Security," the senators wrote in a letter on Thursday.

"Overpayments can pose incredibly difficult hardships on beneficiaries who've committed no wrongdoing and are now responsible for repaying improper payments," the letter continues. "Because of their devastating impact, it is critical for the agency to improve its processes and controls to reduce the number of overpayments for beneficiaries who rely on these critical benefits."

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The senators note that because of the time it takes for overpayments to be detected, recipients can end up with hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. 

The administration said in a statement last year that recipients who are overpaid have several options, including appealing their bill, creating a repayment plan, or declaring bankruptcy.

"Each person's situation is unique, and the agency handles overpayments on a case-by-case basis," the administration said last year. "In particular, if a person doesn't agree that they've been overpaid, or believes the amount is incorrect, they can appeal. If they believe they shouldn't have to pay the money back, they can request that the agency waive collection of the overpayment. There's no time limit for filing a waiver."

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Theodore Bunker

Theodore Bunker, a Newsmax writer, has more than a decade covering news, media, and politics.

© 2024 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


Politics
Legislators are sounding the alarm about Social Security overpayments after the administration issued $11 billion in overpayments in fiscal year 2022, causing debt problems for recipients across the country.
social security, overpayments, peters, stabenow
317
2024-23-01
Friday, 01 March 2024 04:23 PM
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