Tags: mark s. inch | federal | prison | prisoners

Retired General Faces Challenges in Running Federal Prison System

Image: Retired General Faces Challenges in Running Federal Prison System
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By    |   Wednesday, 23 August 2017 10:06 AM

Retired Gen. Mark S. Inch faces a number of challenges in his new role leading the federal prison system, including rising medical costs, little access to job training for prisoners, and a culture resistant to change, according to The Marshall Project.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions tapped Inch to lead the federal prison system on Aug. 1.

"My confidence that he will be a highly effective leader of the Bureau of Federal Prisons is second only to my gratitude for his willingness to continue his service to this great country in this critical role," Sessions said in his announcement.

The general will also face a 14-percent reduction in federal prison jobs in the Trump administration's budget, which would include 1,850 fewer correctional officers, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Federal prison consultant Jack Donson said he believes Inch is a good choice to run the system.

"He would provide strong leadership, demand accountability, transparency, and I believe he would be a general who has the ability to think outside the box," Donson said in the Marshall Project report.

Department of Justice officials told prisoner advocate groups that no hearings would be held to look into Inch's background or his priorities for the leadership role, the Marshall Project report said.

"It's odd to say the least to see another former military officials take the lead on a civilian domestic policy issue. He's kind of a mystery man way out of the blue," said Ed Chung, Center for American Progress vice president for criminal justice reform.

Inch's background in the military is focused on policing and corrections. He trained police forces in Somalia, and was in charge of detainee operations as commanding general of the Combined Joint Interagency Task Force 435 in Kabul, Afghanistan.

In 2014, he was appointed Provost Marshal General, the top military police officer in the Army. He also has served as the commander of the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks in Leavenworth, Kan., according to The Marshall Project.

Donson said in The Marshall Project's report that he hoped Inch could reform the prison agency's top-heavy administration, as well as work on "compassionate release" programs for aged or sick prisoners.

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Retired Gen. Mark S. Inch faces a number of challenges in his new role leading the federal prison system, including rising medical costs, little access to job training for prisoners, and a culture resistant to change, according to The Marshall Project.
mark s. inch, federal, prison, prisoners
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2017-06-23
Wednesday, 23 August 2017 10:06 AM
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