Tags: Barack Obama | North Korea | north korea | nuclear | launch

What Obama Misses Could Be Direct Hit From North Korea

What Obama Misses Could Be Direct Hit From North Korea
Protests over North Korea's launch. (AP)

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Friday, 01 April 2016 02:34 PM Current | Bio | Archive

President Obama denies North Korea can make a nuclear strike against the U.S. or its allies, claiming they cannot make a nuclear weapon "miniaturized" (small and lightweight enough) for missile delivery.

The miniaturization myth never made sense technically and is contradicted by the defense community. But a gullible press goes along with Obama's fiction that North Korea may not have nuclear armed missiles because they have not yet mastered warhead miniaturization.

Now a CNN headline reports "Intel Officials: North Korea 'Probably' Has Miniaturized Nuke." CNN interviewed Adm. William Gortney, commander of North American Aerospace Defense (NORAD), the most outspoken senior officer warning North Korea can strike the U.S. mainland.

On Oct. 8, 2015, NORAD Commander Gortney told the Atlantic Council, "I agree with the intelligence community that we assess that they [the North Koreans] have the ability, they have the weapons, and they have the ability to miniaturize those weapons, and they have the ability to put them on a rocket that can range the [U.S.] homeland."

On April 7, 2015, Gortney said NORAD is moving back into the underground bunker inside Cheyenne Mountain, spending $700 million to further harden the bunker against nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack from North Korea and others.

In March 2016, the Pentagon confirmed North Korea recently rolled out a new intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) the KN-14, having longer range than North Korea's KN-08 ICBM deployed in 2012. Both missiles are armed with nuclear warheads and can strike the U.S. mainland.

The Pentagon also recently announced Gortney will be the first combatant commander replaced by a woman officer, another first for President Obama's sexual revolution in the military. Perhaps this is merely coincidence, or maybe continues Obama's pattern of punishing those who speak truth about North Korea's nuclear missile threat.

Three years ago the defense community got the message not to speak too loudly about nuclear missile threats from North Korea. In 2013, North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un threatened nuclear strikes against the U.S., South Korea, and Japan.

President Obama told NBC on April 16, 2013, he did not believe "North Korea yet had the ability to miniaturize a nuclear weapon to fit atop a missile." White House spokesmen Jay Carney said on April 12,"...obviously the North Koreans have tested nuclear weapons . . . What they have not done is demonstrate . . . a capability to deploy a nuclear-armed missile--attach a warhead to a missile and fire it."

Ironically, on April 16, 2013, on the very day Obama told Americans that Kim Jong Un could not strike the U.S., North Korea's KSM-3 satellite passed over Washington, D.C., and New York City at the optimum trajectory for a surprise EMP attack.

While Obama publicly dismissed North Korea's threats, the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) privately briefed Congress that North Korea does have nuclear armed missiles--which leaked to the press. Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, went to bat for Obama, claiming DIA "did not reflect the consensus view of the 15 other intelligence agencies," according to The New York Times.

But DIA and CIA are the lead agencies for assessing foreign missile threats (few of the 15 others have any expertise) and both reportedly agree North Korea can make nuclear missile warheads.

Obama's miniaturization myth never made technical sense.

Any nation that can make nuclear weapons and orbit a satellite can master the far easier technical challenge of warhead miniaturization.

In the 1950s, the biggest problem was reducing the size and weight of electronics. The microelectronics revolution solved most of the miniaturization problem for all nuclear aspirant nations--including North Korea.

Obama's miniaturization myth so gulled the press that, even when Kim Jong Un recently posed with apparently a miniaturized implosion-type nuclear warhead, the press derided the photo, until corrected by experts.

Ted Cruz has not been swayed by myth and press ignorance.

Cruz said North Korea's Feb. 7 launch of the KSM-4 satellite, orbiting the U.S., could practice an EMP attack that would blackout the national grid, killing millions. "Instant experts" in the Washington Post belittled Cruz, claiming (inaccurately) that EMP attack requires a high-yield H-bomb, too big for the satellite, and great accuracy.

In fact, Cruz is right and his critics wrong.

In 2004, Russian generals warned the EMP Commission the design for their super-EMP warhead leaked "accidentally" to North Korea. A super-EMP weapon would probably be small enough to fit on North Korea's satellites.

No one doubts that Russia, China, India, Pakistan, and Israel can miniaturize warheads and have nuclear missiles.

Why the double standard for North Korea?

President Obama does not want North Korean nuclear missiles to be part of his legacy. And to acknowledge this threat, which arose despite President Bill Clinton's nuclear deal with Pyongyang, is to acknowledge the futility of Obama's nuclear deal with Iran--North Korea's strategic partner.

Peter Vincent Pry is executive director of the Task Force on National and Homeland Security. He served in the Congressional EMP Commission, the Congressional Strategic Posture Commission, the House Armed Services Committee, and the CIA. He is author of "Blackout Wars." For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

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PeterPry
President Obama denies North Korea can make a nuclear strike against the U.S. or its allies, claiming they cannot make a nuclear weapon "miniaturized" (small and lightweight enough) for missile delivery.
north korea, nuclear, launch
850
2016-34-01
Friday, 01 April 2016 02:34 PM
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