Tags: Exclusive Interviews | ISIS/Islamic State | MidPoint | War on Terrorism | britain | airstrikes

John Browne: Brits Fear Terror Attacks for Joining ISIS Airstrikes

By    |   Monday, 29 Sep 2014 05:12 PM

With its vote to join the U.S.-led air war against the Islamic State, the United Kingdom has upheld its role as a key American ally, but ordinary Britons worry they will pay a heavy price in terrorist reprisals, a former Conservative Party member of British Parliament told Newsmax TV on Monday.

John Browne, now senior economic consultant at Euro Pacific Capital, also told "MidPoint" host Ed Berliner that airstrikes have limited value against a terrorist force like the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, that occupies mostly desert terrain in its strongholds in Syria and Iraq.

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"We're wasting billions of dollars on bombing an elusive enemy in distant or near-empty [desert] sand — and bombing is least effective in sand and least effective against terrorists, even when you've got major formation of an army," said Browne. 

"There's no evidence at all that even a conventional war was won by airplanes [alone]," said Browne. "And the British people feel that the backlash in terms of terrorism is going to be very big both in Britain and America."

Browne said that the United Kingdom has a large Muslim population, and whole communities living under Islamic Sharia law with the timid assent of British politicians.

"There are often demonstrations by Muslims in Britain with the banners and the statements on the banners that, if they were spoken or illustrated [in] the native English, the [protesters] would be in jail," said Browne. "But the politicians leave them alone."

Browne said the U.K. is already bracing for the possibility of attacks and altering daily life in a way that could harm the British economy.

He cited a warning last week from London Mayor Boris Johnson that the London Underground — the city's mass transit railway system — is a potential target. The likely result, said Browne, is a slowdown as people avoiding the Underground are later to work, earlier to leave the office, and more likely to shun crowded public places such as department stores and sporting events.

Prime Minister David Cameron and a large majority of Parliament nevertheless voted to join in the airstrikes and honor the longstanding "special relationship" between the United States and Great Britian in matters of global security, said Browne.

"The reason Britain is in there [is] to protect the special relationship, which is a fundamental tenet of British defense policy," he said, "and therefore in order to protect that special relationship we have to agree to go in and join the American bombing."

But the move is "highly unpopular in Britain," said Browne. "It's considered to be illegal — intervention in another country — and secondly, highly expensive."

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With its vote to join the U.S.-led air war against the Islamic State, the United Kingdom has upheld its role as a key American ally, but ordinary Britons worry they will pay a heavy price in terrorist reprisals, a former Conservative Party member of British Parliament told Newsmax TV on Monday.
britain, airstrikes
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2014-12-29
Monday, 29 Sep 2014 05:12 PM
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