Tags: Spain | elected | officials | government

Many in Spain Happy Without Elected Officials

Many in Spain Happy Without Elected Officials

 (Getty Images)

By    |   Sunday, 02 October 2016 09:54 PM

Spain hasn't had an elected national government for almost a year, and many of its residents are OK with that.

"[We] would be just fine if we got rid of most of the politicians and three-fourths of government employees," Rafael Navarro, of Madrid, told The New York Times
as he, like others the newspaper interviewed, believe that it's better to have too little government than too much.

Spain has not had elected officials now for 288 days, as after two national elections in six months and a third vote expected in December, the country has not had a party winning enough seats to form a government, and in the first time in the country's 40 years since it formed a modern democracy, a caretaker government is in charge.

Saturday, Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez resigned, in hopes of opening the way for conservative Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy and his Popular Party to be re-elected.

However, Spaniards have not suffered from the lack of government leaders, as budget money is still being spent and the government's ministries are in charge. There hasn't been a government shutdown, and services such as garbage collection, law enforcement, and public transportation haven't been disrupted, and if there is no government in place when the national 2016 budget expires, those in charge will use the old budget as the new one for 2017.

Spain's gridlock began last October, when Rajoy called a general election. His party won the most votes in December and June, but didn't win a majority and now holds 137 out of the Spanish Parliament's 137 seats.

The county's economy is thriving, though, especially through its tourism industry. But voters have already voted twice and may not feel like voting again.

"It's like ‘Groundhog Day’ every day,” Pedro Rodr�guez, an assistant professor of international relations in Madrid told The Times.

Meanwhile, Manuel de la Rocha V�zquez, a Socialist Party economist, said Spain has become polarized to the point that there are "only insults and blame and arrogance."

Also, Spain could face issues with the European Commission if it can't being its debt under control. It faces a fine of about $5.6 billion if it doesn't hit this year's deficit target, and cutbacks put in place by the nation's caretaker government are hindering many government agencies.

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Spain hasn't had an elected national government for almost a year, and many of its residents are OK with that. [We] would be just fine if we got rid of most of the politicians and three-fourths of government employees, Rafael Navarro, of Madrid, told The New York Times,...
Spain, elected, officials, government
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2016-54-02
Sunday, 02 October 2016 09:54 PM
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