Tags: sleep | deprivation | 8 hours | gdp

Lack of Sleep Costs US $41 Billion Yearly

Lack of Sleep Costs US $41 Billion Yearly

By    |   Thursday, 01 December 2016 03:27 PM

Inadequate sleep is more than an inconvenience — a new report shows it costs the U.S. economy a whopping $41 billion each year and a staggering amount of productivity too.

There's more bad news for the sleep deprived, according to researchers at RAND Europe, part of the RAND Corporation: Sleep deprivation increases the risk of mortality.

Their study, "Why Sleep Matters — The Economic Costs of Insufficient Sleep," shows that people who sleep on average less than six hours per night have a 13 percent higher mortality risk than those who sleep between seven and nine hours. And those who sleep between six and seven hours have a 7 percent higher mortality risk. Sleeping between seven and nine hours per night is described as the "healthy daily sleep range" in the study.

Loss of productivity was defined in the study as a combination of absent employees and employees not performing at an optimal level.

Sleep deprivation also leads to the U.S. losing about 1.2 million working days a year.

Researchers studied employees in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, and Japan to get a clearer picture of what's happening across the globe.

Marco Hafner, a research leader and the report's main author, said: "Our study shows that the effects from a lack of sleep are massive. Sleep deprivation not only influences an individual's health and well-being but has a significant impact on a nation's economy, with lower productivity levels and a higher mortality risk among workers.

"Improving individual sleep habits and duration has huge implications, with our research showing that simple changes can make a big difference. For example, if those who sleep under six hours a night increase their sleep to between six and seven hours a night, this could add $226.4 billion to the U.S. economy."

When researchers looked at individual countries, the United States suffered the greatest financial losses (up to $411 billion, or 2.28 percent of its GDP) and most working days lost (1.2 million).

This was closely followed by Japan ($138 billion, or 2.92 percent of its GDP, and around 600,000 working days lost); Germany ($60 billion, or 1.56 percent of its GDP, and just over 200,000 lost working days); and the U.K. ($50 billion, or 1.86 percent of its GDP, and just over 200,000 working days lost).

Interestingly, Canada fared the best, but still has significant financial and productivity losses (up to $21.4 billion, which is around 1.35 percent of its GDP, and just under 80,000 working days lost).

To improve sleep, the report offered a number common sense measures including consistent wake-up times; limiting the use of electronic items before bedtime; and physical exercise during the day. Employers should recognize the importance of sleep and promote brighter work spaces and even create facilities for daytime naps.
 

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Inadequate sleep is more than an inconvenience — a new report shows it costs the U.S. economy a whopping $41 billion each year and a staggering amount of productivity too.
sleep, deprivation, 8 hours, gdp
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2016-27-01
Thursday, 01 December 2016 03:27 PM
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