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Tags: ncaa | policy | compensation | college | athletes | charlie baker | nil

NCAA Policy Shift: Paying College Athletes in New Subdivision

By    |   Tuesday, 05 December 2023 07:19 PM EST

The NCAA is on the verge of introducing a groundbreaking proposal permitting colleges to compensate their athletes directly, marking a seismic shift in the longstanding stance on amateurism in college sports, as reported by Axios.

NCAA President Charlie Baker is poised to unveil this unprecedented proposal within Division I, offering programs greater autonomy in devising policies and enabling direct compensation for athletes, according to Sporting News.

The proposal targets the lucrative arena of name, image, and likeness (NIL) deals, allowing schools to engage in direct agreements with their student-athletes. While the NCAA had previously lifted its ban on athletes profiting from NIL deals in 2021, this proposal takes it further by allowing direct dealings between athletes and their colleges.

Baker, the former governor of Massachusetts, stressed the need for flexibility, stating, "Colleges and universities need to be more flexible, and the NCAA needs to be more flexible, too."

Historically, the NCAA, founded 117 years ago, staunchly upheld the amateur status of college athletes. However, changing public sentiment and increasing legislative scrutiny have challenged this stance.

Should the proposal be greenlit, participating colleges must allocate a minimum of $30,000 annually to a trust fund for athletes, totaling at least $120,000 for four-year athletes. Each school would determine the disbursement schedule, with Title IX mandating that 50 percent of the investment benefit female athletes.

The new subdivision also grants schools autonomy over scholarship limits, countable coaches, and other vital areas. While teams from both Division I subdivisions would vie for NCAA championships in most sports, FBS football would remain excluded, operating within the framework of the College Football Playoff.

According to Nicole Auerbach of The Athletic, schools would have the option to join the new subdivision, with conferences having the authority to enforce league-wide adoption. This shift is not confined to traditional power-conference schools; any Division I institution willing to make the required financial commitment could be part of this transformative initiative.

A subset of schools boasting significant financial resources and prominent brands would potentially create a distinct subdivision, dictating its roster size, recruitment, and transfer rules.

The proposal emphasizes an equitable distribution of funds within Title IX guidelines, aiming to rectify imbalances between male and female student-athletes, as highlighted by Baker: "help level what is fast becoming a very unlevel playing field between men and women student-athletes."

Additionally, proponents suggest that adopting a model of this nature could potentially mitigate the persistent legal challenges surrounding Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL) issues that have plagued the NCAA throughout its existence.

Jim Thomas

Jim Thomas is a writer based in Indiana. He holds a bachelor's degree in Political Science, a law degree from U.I.C. Law School, and has practiced law for more than 20 years.

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The NCAA is on the verge of introducing a groundbreaking proposal permitting colleges to compensate their athletes directly, marking a seismic shift in the longstanding stance on amateurism in college sports, as reported by Axios.
ncaa, policy, compensation, college, athletes, charlie baker, nil, deal, trust fund
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2023-19-05
Tuesday, 05 December 2023 07:19 PM
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