Tags: Unrest in Charlotte, NC | NC | Law | Body Cam | Videos

North Carolina Joining States Limiting Access to Police Videos

Image: North Carolina Joining States Limiting Access to Police Videos

Clergy and protesters pray outside the Charlotte Police Dept. in Charlotte. (AP)

By    |   Sunday, 25 Sep 2016 10:21 PM

A new law is set to take effect Saturday to make it more difficult for the public to access police video shot by dashboard and body cameras in North Carolina, where days of rioting took place following the police shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte.

North Carolina is one of about two dozen states, along with the District of Columbia, where laws have been passed that change public records laws, reports USA Today, and in most of those places, the laws restrict the release of police videos.

"The vast majority of those laws have restricted public access to police video either by adding additional exemptions in state public records laws, or they've created a presumption that the videos are not public records at all, except in certain circumstances," Adam Marshall, an attorney for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, said Sunday.

For example, in New Hampshire, a law in June said body cam video is a public record only in certain circumstances, such as if it shows an officer using force, if a gun is fired, or an arrest is made for a felony.

The laws' backers say restrictions are needed to protect investigations and crime victims, as requests for videos are made in circumstances other than shootings, including in cases of domestic violence and cases involving children.

In Charlotte, protesters have been calling all week for the video showing Scott's shooting to be released, but Police Chief Kerr Putney initially refused releasing the tapes. On Saturday, he did release some of the footage, while admitting it provided "no definitive, visual evidence" that Scott was holding or pointing a weapon.

However, police said Scott was wearing an ankle holster, and said a loaded gun was found containing the killed man's DNA and fingerprints.

Marshall said North Carolina's law will rule that body cam videos are not public record, and will allow individual agencies to decide whether to release videos. People wishing to obtain videos can file a lawsuit to get the tapes, but Marshall said that can be expensive, where releasing the video quickly could help the public understand better what had happened.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Newsfront
A new law is set to take effect Saturday to make it more difficult for the public to access police video shot by dashboard and body cameras in North Carolina, where days of rioting took place following the police shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte. North...
NC, Law, Body Cam, Videos
358
2016-21-25
Sunday, 25 Sep 2016 10:21 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved