Tags: Marco Rubio | Mitt Romney | Marco Rubio | New York Times | financial | pushes back | Alex Conant

Rubio Pushes Back Against NYT Story Citing Financial Imprudence

Image: Rubio Pushes Back Against NYT Story Citing Financial Imprudence
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks during a "Roast & Ride" campaign event sponsored by Iowa Senator Joni Ernst, R-Iowa. (Dave Kaup/Reuters)

By    |   Tuesday, 09 Jun 2015 12:10 PM

The Rubio campaign has hit back at a New York Times story Tuesday claiming that the Florida senator's personal financial habits have been "imprudent" and at times extravagant.

"First, The New York Times attacks Marco over traffic tickets, and now they think he doesn't have enough money," said Rubio spokesman Alex Conant, according to USA Today. "Of course, if he was worth millions, the Times would then attack him for being too rich, like they did to Mitt Romney."

Tuesday's story by the Times, headlined, "Struggles with Finances Track Marco Rubio's Career" said that Rubio stands out not only for his youth and dramatic political rise but also for persistent doubts about his personal financial management.

"A review of the Rubio family's finances — including many new documents — reveals a series of decisions over the past 15 years that experts called imprudent: significant debts; a penchant to spend heavily on luxury items like the [$80,000 speed] boat and the lease of a $50,000 2015 Audi Q7; a strikingly low savings rate, even when Mr. Rubio was earning large sums; and inattentive accounting that led to years of unpaid local government fees," the Times said.

The Times also said that, separate to his personal spending patterns, there were instances in which he intermingled personal and political money. He used a state Republican Party credit card to pay for a paving project to his home and travel to a family reunion. He also put relatives on campaign payrolls.

Conant said that Rubio has the same financial challenges as many Americans do and that he is not motivated by wealth.

"His goal at this stage in his life is to provide his four children with a good home, a quality education, and a safe and happy upbringing," Conant said in a statement, according to USA Today.

"As he wrote in his book, 'the mark I make in this world will not be decided by how much money I make or how many titles I attain. Rather, the greatest mark I can leave is the one I will make as a father and a husband.'"

A separate story by the Times last week detailed how Rubio was cited four times in 18 years for minor traffic violations while his wife received 13.  The report said that the Rubios received tickets for violations that include speeding, driving through red lights, and careless driving.

The report was ridiculed by pundits and those on social media who felt the paper was trying to discredit him. And an ironic hashtag was created on Twitter: #RubioCrimeSpree.

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The Rubio campaign has hit back at a New York Times story Tuesday claiming that the Florida senator's personal financial habits have been imprudent and at times extravagant.
Marco Rubio, New York Times, financial, pushes back, Alex Conant
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2015-10-09
Tuesday, 09 Jun 2015 12:10 PM
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