Tags: Trump Administration | Voting Rights | Ken Paxton | Texas | Voter ID | Laws | Election

Texas AG Ken Paxton: Voter ID Law Won't Change Before Election

(Fox News/"America's Newsroom")

By    |   Thursday, 18 Aug 2016 12:28 PM

Texas' contested voter ID law does not keep any legally registered voters from casting a ballot, and while the state continues to fight a federal appeals court ruling against the legislation, the law will be in effect during the general election in November, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said Thursday.

"We have a interim order that we've worked out with the Justice Department, so we're going forward with an interim plan that requires an affidavit if somebody does not have a photo ID and cannot get a photo ID," Paxton told Fox News' Martha MacCallum on the "America's Newsroom" program.

This means, he explained, that a declaration of citizenship and proof of residency must also be presented, along with the affidavit that swears the recipient is not able to get the government-issued ID required under Texas law.

The voter ID law was passed in 2011, said Paxton, because voters in his state care about voter integrity.

"My job to represent those voters, so we're going to take it to the highest court of land and, hopefully, get this turned around," said Paxton, denying critics' claims that the law discriminates against black and Hispanic voters.

"I disagree because we've had hundreds of local elections under this law, and the Justice Department was unable to show people couldn't vote," said Paxton. "Literally, there's seven different forms of ID you can use, and almost everyone has them, and we'll give you a free voter ID if you don't have one. We've tried to cover all options and, frankly, this law's worked."

Most Texans, he continued, don't understand the fight against the state's law, as there are many activities that require an identification.

"When I went to hear the voter ID case, I had to use a photo ID to get on the plane, to get to the hotel room, to get into the courtroom," said Paxton. "This is a common practice throughout society. For some reason when we want to protect the integrity of our elections, it's controversial, and frankly, I don't understand that."

Paxton said he does feel that the affidavit plan is a good alternative, as people can be prosecuted for perjury if they lie while signing it.

There are several other states that have applied to the Supreme Court for rulings on their voter ID laws, including North Carolina, said Paxton, and he believes the fight is important not only to Texas, but nationwide "to have elections that are fair and that don't have fraud involved."

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Newsfront
Texas' contested voter ID law does not keep any legally registered voters from casting a ballot, and while the state continues to fight a federal appeals court ruling against the legislation, the law will be in effect during the general election in November...
Ken Paxton, Texas, Voter ID, Laws, Election
416
2016-28-18
Thursday, 18 Aug 2016 12:28 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved