Tags: Trump Administration | Hillary Clinton | hillary clinton | economy | middle class | 2016 | presidency

Hillary's Dilemma: Criticizing Economy, Not Obama's Policies

Image: Hillary's Dilemma: Criticizing Economy, Not Obama's Policies
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By    |   Monday, 02 Feb 2015 08:50 AM

As Hillary Clinton readies herself for what’s considered a certain run for the White House in 2016, she’s boning up significantly on her economic platform, a delicate balancing act in which she must put forward her own ideas while being careful not to be overly critical of her former boss, President Barack Obama.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Clinton, the former secretary of state, has been meeting with respected economists to develop a campaign platform focused on "sluggish wage growth and middle-class prosperity."

"One of Mrs. Clinton’s broader goals is to develop ways to address economic anxiety without sounding like a combative populist or demonizing high-income groups," a source told the Journal.

Under consideration are middle-class tax cuts, expanded pre-kindergarten education, and ideas to fund infrastructure improvements such as tunnels and roads.

Syndicated columnist Donald Lambro wrote in the Washington Times last month that Mrs. Clinton made her first foray into the touchy subject of the economy during a paid speaking gig to business and civic leaders in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

She suggested that the "economic recovery" has done nothing for small- and medium-size businesses, which explains why the United States continues to see low job growth and faltering middle-class incomes, according to the Times.

"Our economy, historically, and job creation, has been driven by small- and medium-sized businesses," she said. "And we’re just not seeing that start up again."

Lambro writes that Clinton, and her husband, President Bill Clinton, don’t want to come across as critics of Obama’s policies even though the couple believes "they have hurt the economy and their party, too."

The Journal points out that by making income inequality a key talking point, Clinton could appeal to followers of Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a liberal icon who is a rising star among the most liberal faction of the Democratic Party.

Warren insists she won’t run for president but it hasn’t stopped the buzz.

During an AFL-CIO union summit in Washington last month, Warren elicited a standing ovation for her defense of the disappearing middle class.

"I see evidence everywhere of the pounding working people are taking," Warren told the crowd, according to the Huffington Post. "These families are working harder than ever, but they can't get ahead.

"Many feel that the game is rigged against them, and they are right. The game is rigged against them."

In her run-up to an announcement, Clinton continues to keep her positions close to the vest.

"Hillary isn’t saying much more beyond the concerns she expressed about the lack of new business formation — at least not yet," according to Lambro.

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As Hillary Clinton readies herself for what's considered a certain run for the White House in 2016, she's boning up on her economic platform, a delicate balancing act in which she must put forward her own ideas while being careful not to be overly critical of President Barack Obama.
hillary clinton, economy, middle class, 2016, presidency
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2015-50-02
Monday, 02 Feb 2015 08:50 AM
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