Tags: Google | right to be forgotten | Europe | privacy

EU Presses Google for Global 'Right to Be Forgotten'

By    |   Wednesday, 26 November 2014 09:36 PM

The European Union is pressing tech giant Google to expand the "right to be forgotten" to all its search tools.

A right to be forgotten ruling —  passed last May by the European Court of Justice allowing people to remove links to unwanted content from Google search results —  currently only applies to certain European sites, and is easy to get around, The New York Times reports.

Someone can still pull up a full list of search results through Google's other sites, including Google.com.

New guidelines, issued by a European body composed of the region’s 28 national privacy regulators, are trying to toughen the law by requiring Google and other search engines to take down links on sites outside the region as well.

"Under E.U. law, everyone has a right to data protection," the regulatory body said.

"Decisions must be implemented in such a way that they guarantee the effective and complete protection of data subjects' rights and that E.U. law cannot be circumvented."

A Google spokesman told The Times the company hadn't reviewed the guidelines yet, which will be published Friday.

The guidelines aren't binding, The Times notes.

"This is a line that U.S. companies will be very reluctant to cross," Ian Brown, a professor of information security and privacy at the University of Oxford, told The Times about the potential global use of Europe’s privacy ruling.

"It will come down to who blinks first. The companies or the privacy regulators."

Any expansion of the "right to be forgotten" decision would only add to Google's considerable problems in Europe, including an antitrust investigation and a resolution expected Thursday in the European Parliament calling for the company's breakup, The Times reports.

The "right to be forgotten" ruling has become a major sticking point between privacy advocates who believe individuals have the right to ask that links be removed and freedom of expression advocates who argue the legal decision unjustly limits what can be published online.

Since the ruling in May, Google — which holds close to 85 percent of Europe’s online search market — has received roughly 175,000 requests from people in Europe and outside the region to yank links to online material, according to the company’s transparency report.

Twelve-thousand requests came on the first day of the ruling.

"The amount of submissions shows that this legal ruling is a success story for Europe’s privacy regulators," privacy lawyer Richard Cumbley in London told The Times. "Right to be forgotten doesn’t show signs of being forgotten anytime soon."

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Newsfront
The European Union is pressing tech giant Google to expand the right to be forgotten to all its search tools. A right to be forgotten ruling - passed last May by the European Court of Justice allowing people to remove links to unwanted content from Google search results...
Google, right to be forgotten, Europe, privacy
413
2014-36-26
Wednesday, 26 November 2014 09:36 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved