Tags: cia | terrorism | report | detention

Human Rights Report: 54 Countries Helped CIA After 9/11

By    |   Tuesday, 05 Feb 2013 10:36 AM

A new report due out on Tuesday reveals that the CIA had help from some 54 countries in operating the agency’s detention and interrogation program after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, according to the New York Times.

The report by the Open Society Justice Initiative, a human rights advocacy group, details how countries offered different kinds of assistance to the United States in the mission against al-Qaida, including the establishment of secret prisons on their soil and use of their airports for refueling planes while transferring prisoners to other countries.

Amrit Singh, author of the “Globalizing Torture” report, told the Times she found evidence that 25 countries in Europe, 14 in Asia, and 13 in Africa, as well as Canada and Australia, had lent support to the CIA. Among the nations who aided the agency were Thailand, Romania, Poland, Lithuania, Denmark, and Gambia.

“The moral cost of these programs was born not just by the U.S. but by the 54 other countries it recruited to help,” said Singh.

The report names 136 people who had been held or transferred by the CIA and details what, when, and where they were held, the biggest list yet compiled, the Times noted.

Many have condemned the interrogation techniques used by the CIA on terrorist suspects, denouncing them as torture and maintaining that they were both ineffective and illegal.

Former Bush administration officials have insisted that the so-called enhanced interrogation methods, such as water boarding and putting people in boxes, were needed to obtain information that was valuable in the war on terror.

The debate has once again heated up with the release of the film “Zero Dark Thirty,” which chronicles the hunt for Osama bin Laden and portrays torture as one of the methods used on CIA captives to get information.

President Barack Obama has banned torture, but after taking office in 2009 he opted not to set up a national commission investigating the use of such practices.

Singh told the Times that the U.S. had violated domestic and international law and that its efforts to avoid accountability were “beginning to break down.”

The Senate Intelligence Committee recently finished its own study of the CIA detention and investigation program, but it is classified and may never be released.


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A new report due out on Tuesday reveals that the CIA had help from some 54 countries in operating the agency's detention and interrogation program after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
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2013-36-05
Tuesday, 05 Feb 2013 10:36 AM
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