Tags: Climate Change | Barack Obama | bluff | GOP | Congress

Pepperdine Prof to Congress: Call Obama's Bluff on Climate Change

By    |   Tuesday, 07 April 2015 09:29 AM

President Barack Obama intends to broker a climate agreement at the next United Nations summit, bypassing Congress, but GOP lawmakers do have options for stopping his unilateral actions, said Steven Hayward.

"From immigration to Internet regulation, there is scarcely an issue on which President Obama has not pushed the limits of executive power to achieve his ideological goals. The Republican Congress has been able only to react to these usurpations, often floundering, as seen in the recent debacle over funding for the Department of Homeland Security.

"Is there a way the GOP Congress can get ahead of Mr. Obama?" the visiting professor at Pepperdine University's graduate School of Public Policy, wrote in an opinion piece in The Wall Street Journal.

He said that Congress has a number of options. For one, the House and Senate could pass a measure requiring that Obama operate within a set of specific parameters and that Congress will have the final say on whether it is upheld.

He also said the House and Senate could pass a bill blocking federal agencies from regulating greenhouse-gas emissions until Congress ratifies the agreement and the nations entering the agreement represent at least 80 percent of global greenhouse emissions.

The measures, he said, would restore some balance to climate-change policy.

"Mr. Obama would surely veto the bills, but this would draw out the administration in ways that would be embarrassing. President Obama, Secretary of State John Kerry and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy have all said that the U.S. can't act alone on climate change.

"These measures would call their bluff," he wrote.

He concluded by saying: "They would expose the breathtaking insincerity and situational ethics of Mr. Obama's executive usurpations. The president has said that climate change is a more serious global threat than Islamic State — on which Mr. Obama has consulted Congress by asking for a new use-of-force resolution. Why not similarly seek the involvement of Congress in global warming, which he considers the more important challenge?"

Meanwhile, Laurence Tribe, the Harvard constitutional legal scholar, has come under fire from those on the left for agreeing to represent Peabody Energy, the nation's largest coal company in its quest to block an Environmental Protection Agency regulation that would cut carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants, a central tenet of Obama's climate change agenda, The New York Times reported.

"That a leading scholar of constitutional matters has identical views as officials of a coal company — that his constitutional views are the same as the views that best promote his client — there's something odd there," Richard Revesz, director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at the New York University School of Law, told the Times.

Tribe characterized Obama's approach to climate change as "misguided."

"I'm sure he's motivated by a deep concern for climate change, and he believes he is following the Constitution as he understands it," Tribe said, according to the Times. "It hasn't affected my esteem for him," he said, adding, "but I don't take responsibility for views of former students that I think are misguided."

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Politics
President Barack Obama intends to broker a climate agreement at the next United Nations summit, bypassing Congress, but GOP lawmakers do have options for stopping his unilateral actions, said Steven Hayward.
Barack Obama, bluff, GOP, Congress
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2015-29-07
Tuesday, 07 April 2015 09:29 AM
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