Tags: amelia earhart | flight | world traveler | smithsonian

Amelia Earhart Eaten by Coconut Crabs? Theory Surfaces Again

Image: Amelia Earhart Eaten by Coconut Crabs? Theory Surfaces Again
Amelia Earhart (AP)

By    |   Tuesday, 14 Nov 2017 08:28 PM

A theory Amelia Earhart was eaten by fierce coconut crabs continues to float around the Internet following a recent viral video of a coconut crab attacking a bird, according to Biz Pac Review.

Coconut crabs can grow up to 3 feet, climb trees and have claws that can heft items up to 60 pounds. According to a recent study, their pincher generates up to an estimated 740 pound-force — about 90 times their own body weight.

Mystery has surrounded Earhart's fate since her plane disappeared in 1937 in the South Pacific. She was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean in 1932, and attempted to fly around the world in 1937 with navigator Fred Noonan.

The pair set off from Lae, New Guinea, on June 29, ready to tackle the next 3,556 miles of their journey to Howland Island but were never seen again. They were never found and, following a massive sea and air search, were declared lost at sea.

One theory states Earhart and Noonan crashed on the Pacific Island of Nikumaroro, where coconut crabs ate them and carried off their remains, according to Smithsonian.com.

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One theory states Amelia Earhart crashed on the Pacific Island of Nikumaroro, where coconut crabs ate her and carried off the remains, according to Smithsonian.com.
amelia earhart, flight, world traveler, smithsonian
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2017-28-14
Tuesday, 14 Nov 2017 08:28 PM
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