Tags: los angeles | california | zoning | judaken

LA Bullied by Zoning Vigilantes

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Sunday, 21 Aug 2016 08:13 AM Current | Bio | Archive

I’m sure you heard of the NIMBY (not in my back yard) movement that dedicates itself to blocking construction of freeways, thru streets, homeless shelters, gun stores, Walmarts, megachurches, and stadiums.

Now California — the nation’s leader in all things wacky and controlling — has a new obstructionist set, the NIYBY (not in your back yard).

As the Washington Post puts it, “The next big fight over housing could happen, literally, in your back yard.” Most people would think the decision not to send ma and pa away to the home when they get too old to care for themselves is to be lauded. Especially when the kids want their aging parents to live with them.

That would be fine with the NIYBY set if granddad and grandma lived in the garage, but when the kids decide to build a small home in their backyard, it’s time to go to the lawyers and the mattresses.

Len Judaken tried to build an 895–square–foot, one–bedroom granddad pad behind one of his children’s homes. Carlyle Hall — a lawyer, wouldn’t you know it — saw the framing for the house and decided that just couldn’t be. So he did the modern American thing and filed a lawsuit, which stopped this type of construction all across Los Angeles.

Hall, who evidently has a degree in self–righteousness along with his legal sheepskin, told the Post he doesn’t care if the project is or is not against the law. He simply objects because it “doesn’t fit into the neighborhood. It’s really changing the character, and you can see it from everywhere,” he proclaimed.

Evidently there is a difference of opinion as to what constitutes that particular neighborhood’s “character” since the Judaken kids thought the house fit just fine. This controversy is just another example of what the cancer of “rights” has done to civil society.

Now self–absorbed people think they can control what you do on your own property if they don’t approve. It could change the view. It could change the trees. Or it could even change the “character.”

Now that the building critics have met with public resistance they are marshaling the same tired talking points. The backyard buildings will reduce parking. And “they question whether small homes, particularly in wealthier neighborhoods with the most room to build them, would really constitute affordable housing.”

The former objection is risible, since elderly parents are moving in because they’ve lost mobility, not because they want a new base when they party. And as for affordability, I suppose that’s a question the people doing the building and the living are more than qualified to answer.

A simple solution would be to limit the occupancy of these homes to immediate family members over 50 years of age. Only I don’t think this latest crop of zoning vigilantes would approve.

Michael Reagan, the eldest son of President Reagan, is a Newsmax TV analyst. A syndicated columnist and author, he chairs The Reagan Legacy Foundation. Michael is an in-demand speaker with Premiere speaker’s bureau. Read more reports from Michael Reagan — Go Here Now.


 

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Len Judaken tried to build agranddad pad behind one of his children’s homes. Carlyle Hall saw the framing for the house and decided that just couldn’t be. So he did the modern American thing and filed a lawsuit, which stopped this type of construction all across Los Angeles.
los angeles, california, zoning, judaken
509
2016-13-21
Sunday, 21 Aug 2016 08:13 AM
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