Tags: east carolina pirates | marching band | national anthem

Just Consequences for Marching Band National Anthem Snub

Just Consequences for Marching Band National Anthem Snub

Quarterback Philip Nelson #9 of the East Carolina Pirates looks to pass while being pursued defensive end Trevon Hill #94 of the Virginia Tech Hokies in the second half at Lane Stadium on September 24, 2016, in Blacksburg, Virginia. Virginia Tech defeated East Carolina 54-17. (Michael Shroyer/Getty Images)

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Sunday, 16 October 2016 02:31 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Recently college kids late to the bandwagon decided to make a statement where the less virtuous would be unable to miss it. Nineteen members of the East Carolina Pirates marching band took a knee while playing the Star Spangled Banner during a home game. It wasn’t after receiving a punt, since they aren’t on the football team, but rather to protest, well, who knows exactly what they thought they were protesting?

The black citizens that held a sit-in at North Carolina diners in the last century were protesting Jim Crow laws that forbid restaurants to serve them: an obvious injustice with a practical remedy. Now Jim Crow laws are long gone. So what sort of injustice still exists in a nation with a black president?

Beats me. Beats them, too although they have a fog bank of issues they say they care about.

Naturally, injecting their leftist political views into an event beginning with the National Anthem didn’t sit well with many of the fans and there were loud objections from the crowd. The next week ECU Chancellor Cecil Staton — who according to one member of the faculty knew about the offensive protest before it began — issued the standard university mealy–mouthed "apology" designed to pacify the rednecks without offending the students.

Staton pontificated, "As an institution of higher learning, East Carolina respects the rights of our students, staff and faculty to express their personal views." He then instructed football fans to demonstrate "respect for each other’s views." And that, for Staton, was that, until Jeff Andrulonis decided he’s had enough.

Fox News reports that one day after the non-apology apology Andrulonis announced his radio station, an ESPN affiliate, would not be carrying the football game between the Pirates and South Florida. He said the slap in the face to patriots and law enforcement was "shameful" and "They’re college students and it’s about time they get an education on the concept that their actions have consequences."

This remarkable stand produced two very interesting byproducts. First, it showed believers that capitalism still exists in universities and two, there are still businessmen who are willing to cost themselves money to do what’s right.

Shortly after the game was bounced from the airwaves a letter was issued by director of athletic bands, the director of the school of music, and the dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communication that said the protest "felt hurtful to many in our Pirate family and disrespectful to our country" and such exhibitionism "will not be tolerated moving forward."

The prospect of losing revenue from game broadcasts was enough to bring some sense to at least one college administration even though it also cost a patriotic businessman.

College students are of course free to protest injustices imaginary and otherwise on their own. What they are not free to do, without consequences, is abandon their duty to their organization and bring its reputation into disrepute. College administrations also need to learn their ivory tower is surrounded by taxpayers that make the university possible and sticking a thumb in their eye is not conducive to future success.

That’s a valuable lesson for them and the rest of the country.

Michael Reagan, the eldest son of President Reagan, is a Newsmax TV analyst. A syndicated columnist and author, he chairs The Reagan Legacy Foundation. Michael is an in-demand speaker with Premiere speaker’s bureau. Read more reports from Michael Reagan — Go Here Now.

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Nineteen members of the East Carolina Pirates marching band took a knee while playing the Star Spangled Banner during a home game. It wasn’t after receiving a punt, since they aren’t on the football team, but rather to protest, well, who knows exactly what they thought they were protesting?
east carolina pirates, marching band, national anthem
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2016-31-16
Sunday, 16 October 2016 02:31 AM
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