Tags: whistleblowers | pelosi | schiff | hirono

Constitutional Crisis Started by Dems, Not Trump

us president donald trump at a rally in bossier city louisiana

President Donald Trump listens as Louisiana Republican gubernatorial candidate Eddie Rispone speaks during a campaign rally at the CenturyLink Center, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, in Bossier City, La. (Evan Vucci/AP)

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Monday, 18 November 2019 04:02 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, may not have been exaggerating when he likened the impeachment proceedings to a "communist revolution."

Consider recent events.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi once again got the fundamental principles of due process backwards Sunday during an appearance on CBS News’ "Face The Nation."

She said the president has "every opportunity to present his case" at the impeachment hearings.

"The president could come right before the committee and talk, speak all the truth that he wants if he wants," the California Democrat told moderator Margaret Brennan.

President Donald Trump "has every opportunity to present his case."

Speaker Pelosi made a similar claim Thursday when she was asked why the rights of the whistleblower, who isn’t accused of anything, should be superior to those of the president, who’s accused of yet-unidentified "high crimes and misdemeanors."

"Well, the president can come, if he has a case to make, does he want to come speak? Does he want. . .   in writing or speak to the committee about, what might be exculpatory? He has that right," she said. "Nobody should have the right to endanger whistleblowers."

Pelosi may have an excuse. She’s never been trained in the law, although you’d expect her to have picked up something along the way with her 32-year experience as a lawmaker.

However, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., seconded Pelosi’s invitation at a Sunday press conference, and the New York Democrat should know better — he’s a Harvard Law graduate.

"Speaker Pelosi invited President Trump to come testify, and I think her invitation is correct," he said. "If Donald Trump doesn’t agree with what he’s hearing, doesn’t like what he’s hearing, he shouldn’t tweet. He should come to the committee and testify under oath, and he should allow all those around him to come to the committee and testify under oath."

The impeachment hearings are being held by the House Intelligence Committee rather than the Committee on Judiciary, as is the custom. Onlookers have accused its chairman, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., of making up the committee rules as he goes along -- and they all favor the Democrats.

One of those rules is that the president isn’t allowed to have his own counsel present at the hearings to cross examine the witnesses. If Trump can’t even have his own lawyer there with him, why should he risk an appearance?

Right to counsel is one of the most basic rights of anyone accused of a wrongdoing. But more than that, stating that the president “should come to the committee and testify under oath” suggests he’s under an obligation to prove his innocence. He’s not. It’s the Democrats’ job to prove his guilt.

Presumption of innocence until proven guilty is the most basic rights of an accused. Yet beginning with Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s Senate confirmation hearings last year, Democrats repeatedly got it backwards.

When Kavanaugh was accused of multiple claims of sexual misconduct on the flimsiest of evidence, Senate Democrats repeatedly insisted he was required to prove his innocence -- just as Pelosi and Schumer suggest of Trump.

Schumer said of Kavanaugh that “there’s no presumption of innocence -- period.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, a Connecticut Democrat and a Yale Law graduate, agreed with Schumer, and said that Kavanaugh was required to prove his own innocence.

Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, a Georgetown Law graduate, even seemed to suggest that Kavanaugh should not be presumed innocent because of his pro-life views.

Apart from the fact that proving one’s innocence is backwards, proof of innocence is a nearly impossible standard to meet. The accused is placed in the position of trying to prove a negative — that something didn’t happen. 

Schiff railed against the president at the California Democratic Party's Fall Endorsing Convention Saturday.

"The most grave threat to the life and health of our democracy comes from within, from a president without ethical compass, without an understanding of or devotion to our Constitution and the beautiful series of checks and balances it established," the California Democrat said at the event, likened to Comic-Con, but for Democrat nerds.

Schiff is right — the threat to the republic and the Constitution comes from within.

But it emanates from the Democratic Party, not the White House.

And by placing an impossible standard on the president — proof of innocence — it could be the prototype for a government coup — the reversal of a lawful election.

The seeds were sown with Kavanaugh, and the plan is taking root with Trump.

And whether by accident or design, so far it seems to be working.

Michael Dorstewitz is a retired lawyer and has been a frequent contributor to BizPac Review and Liberty Unyielding. He is also a former U.S. Merchant Marine officer and an enthusiastic Second Amendment supporter, who can often be found honing his skills at the range. To read more of his reports — Click Here Now.

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MichaelDorstewitz
Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., is right, the threat to the republic and the Constitution comes from within. But it emanates from the Democratic Party, not the White House.
whistleblowers, pelosi, schiff, hirono
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2019-02-18
Monday, 18 November 2019 04:02 PM
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