Tags: teen vogue | prostitution

Teen Vogue Wrong for Trying to Normalize Prostitution

Teen Vogue Wrong for Trying to Normalize Prostitution
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Wednesday, 19 June 2019 05:55 PM Current | Bio | Archive

At a time when human sex trafficking through the southern border has reached crisis levels, a popular magazine ran an article headlined, “Why Sex Work Is Real Work,” arguing that work in the sex trade is just like any other nine-to-five job and shouldn’t be ostracized or criminalized.

The name of the publication is “Teen Vogue,” which specifically caters to girls as young as 13, as well as 10-year-olds who want to feel all grown up. On this one they may have grown up a lot faster than intended.

Dr. Tlaleng Mofokeng, a South Africa-based physician, argues that the rest of the world should emulate Amsterdam, a city known for legal prostitution. She states that “we disregard the needs and opinions of” of sex workers and “misunderstand what sex work actually is.”

So she proceeds to tell her young readers what it’s like to work in the sex industry.

“Not all sex workers engage in penetrative sex,” she says, “though, undeniably, that is a big part of sex work.”

Chicago-based entrepreneur, radio host, TV personality and author Carol Roth asked, “Was there not ONE editor at Teen Vogue that thought, ‘hey, maybe this article isn’t appropriate for our audience?’ TEEN Vogue.”

Pro-life activist Lila Rose, who founded the anti-abortion nonprofit Live Action, was dumbfounded by the nonchalant, matter-of-fact approach the author took.

“Thousands of little girls are sexually exploited and trafficked every day by manipulative rapists & pimps and @teenvogue is telling them it’s like getting a job at a smoothie shop,”she said. “Teen Vogue is a sex trafficker’s best friend.”

Proponents of legalized prostitution argue that it’s a victimless crime. But those who know it firsthand disagree.

Rebekah Charleston was forced into prostitution at the age of 17, and is now a North Texas-based anti-trafficking activist and executive director of Valiant Hearts, a nonprofit organization working to end sexual exploitation.

Earlier this year she filed a lawsuit against the state of Nevada, arguing that its legal brothels promote interstate trafficking of prostitution in violation of federal law.

"Prostitution is inherently violent and no state in America should be a pimp-by-proxy, which is exactly what Nevada is doing by allowing brothels to exist," Charleston said, according to The Dallas Morning News. "It not only violates federal laws, but it also makes women public sexual property."

She knows something of how trafficking works. She was forced into the business in Dallas and then transported to work the trade in Nevada.

The drive to normalize behavior that was previously considered unacceptable or even aberrant has escalated in recent years.

It’s past time to get back to the basics of right and wrong. It's wrong to normalize sex trafficking. And we should never romanticize a life of prostitution to impressionable 13-year-old girls. Let them enjoy their childhood. Let them dream of being doctors, lawyers, teachers, and engineers — not prostitutes.

Michael Dorstewitz is a retired lawyer and has been a frequent contributor to BizPac Review and Liberty Unyielding. He’s also a former U.S. Merchant Marine officer and an enthusiastic Second Amendment supporter, who can often be found honing his skills at the range. To read more of his reports - Click Here.

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MichaelDorstewitz
It’s past time to get back to the basics of right and wrong.
teen vogue, prostitution
532
2019-55-19
Wednesday, 19 June 2019 05:55 PM
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