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Pope Francis Calls for Change to 'Lord's Prayer' and Critics Go Mad

Pope Francis Calls for Change to 'Lord's Prayer' and Critics Go Mad
Pope Francis arrives for the weekly general audience in Paul VI hall on December 12, 2018, at the Vatican. (Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images)

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Wednesday, 12 December 2018 11:57 AM Current | Bio | Archive

The minor stir Pope Francis created a year ago when he first suggested the English translation of “The Lord’s Prayer” was flawed has since escalated now that he’s officially calling for a word change.

The pontiff observed that the phrase, “lead us not into temptation,” is problematic, and is calling to replace those words with “abandon us not when in temptation.”

Actor and conservative political commentator Michael J. Knowles said in apparent disbelief, “Of all the prayers to rewrite...”

In a Daily Wire post, Knowles reasoned that the original phrasing — “lead us not into temptation” — may be the most accurate by virtue of the ancient Greek word “peirasmos,” meaning “temptation.”

“The Lord’s Prayer,” also known as the “Our Father” and the “Pater Noster,” has been described as the perfect prayer by Christians and is common to Catholics and Protestants alike.

Replies to The Wire and Knowles were almost universally contemptuous, with claims that Pope Francis was changing the word of God, rewriting scripture without authority, and that it’s time for the Vatican to begin draining its swamp — beginning with the pontiff.

Over the two millennia since Christ first delivered the Pater Noster in his native Aramaic to instruct the faithful how to pray, it was first translated into ancient Greek, then to Latin, then finally to modern-day languages.

No matter how meticulous and careful the translators are, something inevitably gets lost in each translation — something is added, something is lost, something is changed.

Although the change in phrasing is a minor one, it wasn’t entered into lightly. The pope first suggested it a year ago.

“The French have changed the text and their translation says ‘don't let me fall into temptation,’” Francis observed at that time. “It's me who falls. It's not Him [God] who pushes me into temptation, as if I fell. A father doesn't do that. A father helps you to get up right away. The one who leads into temptation is Satan.”

He added, “It is not a good translation because it speaks of a God who induces temptation.”

In addition, the notion didn’t originate with the pontiff. Religious scholars and historians have been struggling with and debating the issue for at least 15 years.

Evangelical leader Franklin Graham, son of the late Rev. Billy Graham, appeared on "Fox & Friends" Tuesday and saw merit in the change.

“He may have a point here,” he told the hosts, adding that “we do recognize there have been translation errors.” He added, however, that he’ll continue reciting the version he memorized as a child.

Fox News host Ainsley Earhardt asked, “God can allow temptation, but isn’t it Satan that leads you into temptation?”

Graham agreed, adding that, “We have to understand that there is an evil one out there, there is a devil, who wants to destroy your life and my life… and we want to avoid temptation.”

It may not just be the Catholic Church that may make the change.

An Episcopal Conference representative remarked that, “the bishops intend for the publication of the new edition to be an opportunity to help renew the ecclesiastic community.”

But in the meantime, the message for all the detractors should be: No, Pope Francis is not rewriting the word of God.

Michael Dorstewitz is a retired lawyer and has been a frequent contributor to BizPac Review and Liberty Unyielding. He’s also a former U.S. Merchant Marine officer and an enthusiastic Second Amendment supporter, who can often be found honing his skills at the range. To read more of his reports - Click Here.

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The minor stir Pope Francis created a year ago when he first suggested the English translation of “The Lord’s Prayer” was flawed has since escalated now that he’s officially calling for a word change.
pope, francis, lords prayer
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2018-57-12
Wednesday, 12 December 2018 11:57 AM
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