Tags: 2020 Elections | Donald Trump | Education | Joe Biden | Law Enforcement | Presidential History | markey

2020 Is 1968 All Over Again — A Win for Law and Order

nixon wins presidency for first term pre watergate
Then-Republican presidential candidate Richard Nixon (C) is accompanied by is family, David Eisenhower (not pictured). From left to right, Julie Nixon, Tricia Nixon and wife Patricia after the election results of November, 1968. (AFP/via Getty Images)

By Wednesday, 16 September 2020 11:20 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Recent events are swiftly propelling the 2020 presidential election into a single-issue race of law and order. Even some high school students seem to understand that, if their "woke" teachers, administrators and coaches don’t.

And in that respect 2020 is a redux of 1968, when law and order candidate Richard Nixon defeated "love and peace" candidate Hubert Humphrey during a similar era of civil unrest.

It’s been building for months now and the battle lines really started to gel on Friday, the 19th anniversary of the terrorist attack on 9/11, which snuffed out nearly 3,000 lives.

Southwest Ohio high school football players wanted to honor the heroes who died that day by running out on the field displaying a Thin Blue Line flag representing law enforcement, and a Thin Red Line flag representing firefighters.

They wanted to honor the first responders who sacrificed their lives when they ran into the danger while nearly everyone else was trying to escape it.

The students wanted to honor those who died before the students were even born.

They sought and were denied permission to do so before the game, but they did it anyway, in spite of facing disciplinary action.

"Were you trying to make some kind of a political statement here?" Local 12 News asked Brady Williams, a Little Miami High School senior cornerback.

"No," he quickly answered.

"Not at all. I was just doing it to honor the people that lost their lives 19 years ago."

Williams, whose father is a police officer, carried the Thin Blue Line flag. Teammate Jarad Bentley carried the Thin Red Line flag.

"I was all for it," Bentley said. "Because my dad is a firefighter, and if it had been him killed on 9/11, I would have wanted someone to do it for him."

Both boys were initially suspended from play, but the board of education wisely lifted the suspension Tuesday.

But on the West Coast Saturday things took a turn for the worst in the aftermath of an ambush shooting of two Los Angeles county deputies.

Rather than coming to their aid or, at a minimum, call 9-1-1, at least one bystander used his phone to record the scene, make fun of the severely injured officers and laugh about the incident.

Conservative actor James Woods posted the video to his Twitter account and added a message: "Here’s the reaction of an eyewitness to the ambush of two Deputies shot in the head in #Compton, he said. “The victims are in the background. No one is going to help them. Vote like your life depends on it. #BlueLivesMatter."

Just as significant is each campaign’s official response to the shooting, beginning with the president.

"We’re looking for him," Trump said of the gunman, "and when we find that person, we’ve got to get much faster with our courts and we’ve got to get much tougher with our sentencing."

The president added, "Animals that must be hit hard," referring to criminals who target law enforcement.

"If [the deputies] die, fast trial death penalty for the killer. Only way to stop this!"

He predicted that his opponent’s reaction would be weaker.

"He’s not strong for law and order and everybody knows that," Trump said of Biden during at a "Latinos for Trump" event.

And Trump was right. Biden used the shooting as a springboard for gun control.

"Weapons of war have no place in our communities," the former vice president tweeted. "We need to ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines."

The shooter in this case used a handgun.

On Monday Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., took the issue even further. In response to the use of tear gas on rioters, he called for the total disarmament of law enforcement officers — both lethal and non-lethal weapons.

"Portland police routinely attack peaceful protestors with brute force," he tweeted.

"We must disarm these officers, and every other police department in America, of weapons of war, and enact a nationwide ban on tear gas, rubber and plastic bullets, and bean bag rounds."

So what’s after that? Harsh language, or might that hurt someone’s feelings?

It’s odd that the only vocal adults in the room seem to be the president — who’s often accused of being petulant and impulsive — and a couple of small town high school football players.

But in reality there’s another bloc of non-vocal adult voices in the room.

It’s the "great silent majority" that Nixon spoke of in 1968, who still believe in law and order, American values, the sanctity of life and respect for fellow Americans.

That was the bloc of voters sending Nixon to the White House on Nov. 5, 1968; that’s the same bloc that will keep Trump there  52 years later.

Have faith and vote on November 3.

Michael Dorstewitz is a retired lawyer and has been a frequent contributor to BizPac Review and Liberty Unyielding. He is also a former U.S. Merchant Marine officer and an enthusiastic Second Amendment supporter, who can often be found honing his skills at the range. Read Michael Dorstewitz's Reports — More Here.

© 2020 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


   
1Like our page
2Share
MichaelDorstewitz
There’s another bloc of non-vocal adult voices in the room. It’s the “great silent majority” that Nixon spoke of in 1968, who still believe in law and order, American values, the sanctity of life, and respect for fellow Americans.
markey, nixon
845
2020-20-16
Wednesday, 16 September 2020 11:20 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved