Tags: bernie sanders | socialism | speech

Bernie Pushes the Big Lie: Socialism

Bernie Pushes the Big Lie: Socialism
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) delivers remarks at a campaign function in the Marvin Center at George Washington University on June 12, 2019 in Washington, D.C. Sanders discussed democratic socialism in his address. (Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)

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Thursday, 13 June 2019 04:24 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who self-describes as a democratic-socialist, defended his political beliefs in a speech at George Washington University Wednesday afternoon.

The 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful claimed that socialism was the logical progression from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal legislation eight decades earlier, and called for a new bill of rights.

But when you analyze his argument, you can’t help but be reminded of a line in the rock ‘n’ roll classic “Won’t Get Fooled Again” by The Who. It goes, “Meet the new boss; same as the old boss.”

It comes down to control — others have it; Sanders wants it. Control was a running theme throughout his speech.

He argued that, “We see huge private monopolies — operating outside of any real democratic oversight and often subsidized by taxpayers — with the power to control almost every aspect of our lives.”

He also claimed, “Right now, in the United States of America, three families control more wealth than the bottom half of our country.”

Sanders’ most passionate argument was a claim that “there is a growing movement towards oligarchy and authoritarianism in which a small number of incredibly wealthy and powerful billionaires own and control a significant part of the economy and exert enormous influence over the political life of our country.”

Sanders confuses wealth with control. They’re not synonymous.

He either fails or refuses to comprehend that people living in a free, open, capitalist society control their own lives. Large corporations may be wealthy, but they only attain their wealth by catering to us — by offering goods or services that consumers want.

Consumers control their own lives with every purchase they make, based on price, quality, esthetics, or any other criteria that’s important to them at the time.

No business, whether it’s a large corporation or a mom and pop operation, controls consumers; consumers control businesses. Accordingly, businesses constantly strive to improve whatever it is that they’re trying to sell in order to serve consumers and make a profit.

But Sanders would have you transfer your ability to control your own life over to him.

He praised the Bill of Rights — the first 10 Amendments of the U.S. Constitution — but argued that they didn’t go far enough in a 21st century America, and called for an economic bill of rights.

“Now, we must take the next step forward and guarantee every man, woman and child in our country basic economic rights — the right to quality health care, the right to as much education as one needs to succeed in our society, the right to a good job that pays a living wage, the right to affordable housing, the right to a secure retirement, and the right to live in a clean environment.”

What he failed to mention is that Americans already have those rights — and can exercise them or not as they wish.

Americans have access to what is arguably the best health care system in the world, as confirmed by every foreigner who travels to the United States for treatment.

Every person is free to pursue their own educational goals, work in their chosen profession, purchase a home, and set aside for the future. And the United States already has one of the cleanest environments of all industrial nations in the world.

Sanders closed with a call for freedom.

“What I believe is that the American people deserve freedom — true freedom. Freedom is an often used word but it’s time we took a hard look at what that word actually means. Ask yourself: what does it actually mean to be free?” he asked.

Sanders should probably ask that question of someone who fled a socialist paradise like Cuba, Venezuela, or North Korea.

They may say it means the freedom to choose their own physician and to receive timely treatment. Freedom to pursue their own vocation in life and be paid for their efforts. Freedom to purchase whatever products or services they want without waiting in line.

Venezuela was the wealthiest nation in South America until it turned to socialism. There was a joke that made the rounds a few months back. It goes, “How did Venezuelans illuminate their homes before they had candles?” The answer: Electricity.

Not all fairy tales begin with, “Once upon a time.” Most start out, “If elected I promise.” Sanders has that second kind of fairy tale down pat. But that kind never ends with “and everyone lived happily ever after.”

Michael Dorstewitz is a retired lawyer and has been a frequent contributor to BizPac Review and Liberty Unyielding. He’s also a former U.S. Merchant Marine officer and an enthusiastic Second Amendment supporter, who can often be found honing his skills at the range. To read more of his reports - Click Here.

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MichaelDorstewitz
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who self-describes as a democratic-socialist, defended his political beliefs in a speech at George Washington University Wednesday afternoon.
bernie sanders, socialism, speech
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2019-24-13
Thursday, 13 June 2019 04:24 PM
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