Tags: 2020 Elections | Joe Biden | Kamala Harris | Unions | covid | perdue | unionism

Georgia's Right to Work Law at Risk in Senate Election

right to work and right to work law

 (Yurii Kibalnik/Dreamstime.com)

By Thursday, 31 December 2020 03:07 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Georgia voters may not realize it, but the fate of the state’s decades-old Right to Work law, which protects workers from being forced to join or pay dues to a labor union, may be in the balance on Jan. 5, 2021.

Fact is, if Jon Ossoff, Raphael Warnock, and Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., have their way, the Right to Work protections workers enjoy in 27 states, including the Peach State, will be on the chopping block.

Since 1947, Georgians have had the right to get and keep a job without being forced to pay union dues or fees thanks to the state’s popular Right to Work law.

In Georgia, like all Right to Work states, individual workers choose whether to join and financially support a labor union.

Right to Work makes union officials more accountable to the workers they represent.

Responsive, effective unions should have no trouble attracting the voluntary support of workers. Meanwhile, when union officials pursue an agenda out of touch with the rank-and-file they purport to "represent," workers deserve the option of cutting off financial support.

Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue understand the importance of protecting the right of Georgia’s workers to decide what to do with their hard-earned money.

They both cosponsored the National Right to Work Act to repeal provisions in federal law that authorize union officials to have workers fired simply for refusing to pay union dues or fees.

But their opponents Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff want to strip Georgians of the Right to Work protections they’ve had for over 70 years.

Like Joe Biden, Kamala Harris, Sen. Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, they both support the so-called PRO-Act, the largest proposed expansion of union boss privilege in decades whose signature provision is the elimination of Right to Work protections for workers in all 27 Right to Work states, including Georgia.

It’s no idle threat.

Not with current minority leader Schumer on record in favor of abolishing the legislative filibuster. Make no mistake — if Schumer manages to take control of the Senate in January, all 27 state Right to Work laws, including Georgia’s, will be under attack from Washington, D.C.

Eliminating Right to Work would be a huge mistake, and not just for Georgia workers who would find themselves forced by union officials to pay up or be fired.

Right to Work gives Georgia an important edge in attracting jobs and creating economic prosperity.

In the decade since 2009, Georgia has seen 27% growth in total private sector employment.

That’s nearly 50% more than the non-Right to Work states during the same period.

Right to Work not only means more jobs, it also means better pay.

Households in Georgia have an average after-tax, cost of living adjusted annual income higher than every state without a Right to Work law and nearly $11,000 higher than the average household in those forced unionism states.

That extra spending power goes a long way towards boosting Georgia’s economy.

Georgians — like all Americans — overwhelmingly support Right to Work. They embrace the freedom of choice it provides workers and the economic prosperity that comes with it.

Like the rest of the country, the state is dealing with the economic challenges created by COVID-19.

That makes Right to Work, with its proven track record of job creation, an asset to Georgia now more than ever.

Georgia deserves representatives in Congress who will defend its over 70 year old Right to Work law, not attack it from the floor of the US Senate.

Georgians should remember that the choice they make could determine the future of their state’s longstanding Right to Work law.

Mark Mix is president of the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation and the National Right to Work Committee. Mix began working for the National Right to Work Committee in 1990, becoming Executive Vice President before being named President of both the Committee and the Foundation in 2003. To read more of his reports Click Here Now.

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MarkMix
Georgia deserves representatives in Congress who will defend its over 70 year old Right to Work law, not attack it from the floor of the U.S. Senate. Georgians should remember that the choice they make could determine the future of their state’s longstanding Right to Work law.
covid, perdue, unionism
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2020-07-31
Thursday, 31 December 2020 03:07 PM
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