Tags: Abortion | poland

Poland: Eugenic Abortion Unconstitutional

marchers carry signs and a coat hanger
People take part in a demonstration against the abortion ban in Warsaw, Poland, on Thursday. (Piotr Lapinski/NurPhoto via AP)

By Friday, 30 October 2020 09:08 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Breaking out amidst much larger anti-coronavirus restrictions protest marches, a wave of violent pro-abortion demonstrations has engulfed Poland, paralyzing over 100 large and medium-sized towns, including the capital city of Warsaw. Young women have been prominent among them. "Abortion on demand" is their rallying cry.

Over the weekend, the radicals attacked government installations and parliamentary deputies' offices. In one city they took over an abandoned hospital and proclaimed it an abortion clinic. They blocked streets and highways. Most shockingly, they desecrated 74 churches and interrupted masses in 23 cases with vicious threats, lewd slogans, and vulgar behavior, for instance at the Poznan Cathedral. In Warsaw, the radicals even defaced a monument to Ronald Reagan, a much beloved figure to most Poles.

Some of the demonstrators waved "abortion" hangers around; and a few came dressed like extras from The Handmaid's Tale. Both phenomena are lifted artificially from the American feminist arsenal. They are culturally alien to Poland. Until recently, such dry-cleaning artefacts neither existed on the Vistula, nor is the author Margaret Atwood a household name at all.

Through and through,, the protest marches bear an unmistakable mark of progressive American inspiration and influence. First, there are progressive U.S. foundations that bankroll Poland's radical NGOs, which support and train the radical activists. Then, as Gladden Pappin has perceptively noted, don't forget that America's Big Tech loathes the current Polish government and the nation's Christian and patriotic tradition. It is squarely behind the protests.

Further, according to Declan Leary, the radical agenda also enjoys the backing of U.S. Embassy in Warsaw. Other Western diplomatic missions likewise support the revolutionary sexual postulates, if not overtly the actions of the protesters. The echo chamber produces predictable results back in the U,S., where Poland's lifestyle revolutionaries are depicted as righteous "freedom fighters," and their detractors are cancelled as evil.

The tactics of the Polish demonstrators are straight out of the radical LBGT ACT UP organization; and their anti-Christian antics are an ugly version of the sacrilegious gay "Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence" outfit which specializes in disrupting the Holy Mass in San Francisco.

In congruence with the American feminist ideology, private is now public in Poland. Whenever opposed, the abortion champions turn to hysterical violence with impunity, because, in general, the Polish culture recoils from physically confronting women. Along with the attacks on churches, turning to female-executed violence, the Polish counterparts of their American sisters have broken yet another important taboo: Women turned to aggression just like in the U.S. in the 1960s, according to David Horowitz and Peter Collier.

What triggered the fury? On October 22, Poland's Constitutional Tribunal ruled that eugenic abortion is unconstitutional. Poland's abortion laws are very restrictive but exceptions were made for terminating a child, if a doctor suspected damage to the fetus, a serious disease, or handicap. The court decided that the Constitution protects all equally; hence, discrimination against the ill and handicapped promotes eugenics and therefore should be illegal.

All hell broke loose. Demonstrators flooded the streets. They were aided and abetted by corporate media and opposition politicians. The slogan of "Abortion on demand" reverberates in the streets and in the nation's legislature, the Sejm, where radical deputies took to disrupting the proceedings.

However, Poland's not Western Europe. The patriots are not just going to roll over and play dead. The furious ones have immediately encountered opposition. And it is not the Polish police.

Assorted Polish volunteers flocked to defend their churches. Sometimes it is enough for them to stand guard outside, and the demonstrators disperse, as was the case with St. Cross Church in Warsaw. In some places, the defenders gave the male invaders a chase, for example at Poznan's Most Holy Maiden Mary in Sumo.

The defenders are a multifarious and multigenerational phenomenon. The most dynamic of them are indubitably soccer fans, including the Legia team in Warsaw and the Lech squad in Poznań. There are also various outfits affiliated with the conservative, nationalist, and libertarian parliamentary coalition Konfederacja (Confederacy). The most prominent among them are the Christian nationalist kids from All Polish Youth (MW) and the National Radical Camp (ONR).

In Cracow certain Konfederacja sympathizers patrol the entire town: moving from church to church to thwart the troublemakers. Among the patrolmen, arguably the most prominent one is an MW activist, Bawer Aondo-Akaa, half-Polish and half-Nigerian. He suffers from cerebral palsy and zooms around in his wheelchair. He never tires of stressing that had his mother chosen the eugenic abortion option, he would not be around to earn a Ph.D. 

The consensus among the defenders is that the barbarians must be stopped now before it is too late and the Poles wake up in an occupied country like many Americans feel they did because they had failed to fight back early on.

Marek Jan Chodakiewicz is Professor of History at the Institute of World Politics, a graduate school of statecraft in Washington D.C.; expert on East-Central Europe's Three Seas region; author, among others, of "Intermarium: The Land Between The Baltic and Black Seas." Read Marek Jan Chodakiewicz's Reports — More Here.

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Breaking out amidst much larger anti-coronavirus restrictions protest marches, a wave of violent pro-abortion demonstrations has engulfed Poland, paralyzing over 100 large and medium-sized towns, including the capital city of Warsaw.
poland
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2020-08-30
Friday, 30 October 2020 09:08 AM
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