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UK Will Invite Trump To London — But Is It 'State Visit' or 'Working Trip?'

UK Will Invite Trump To London — But Is It 'State Visit' or 'Working Trip?'
(AP)

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Saturday, 25 November 2017 07:56 AM Current | Bio | Archive

As soon as Buckingham Palace makes the long-anticipated announcement that Prince Harry is engaged — either Sunday or Monday — the British government is expected to announce that President Trump will be invited to London in early 2018.

News of a pending invitation to Trump was first reported on Thanksgiving Day by White House Correspondent Ksenija Pavlovic. Citing a source close to No. 10 Downing Street (the official residence of British Prime Minister Theresa May), The Pavlovic Report predicted the announcement of a Trump invitation soon.

But the question still remains what it was when Newsmax brought up the subject with White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders October 20, whether Trump will be invited for a formal "state visit," which is by invitation of Queen Elizabeth II and includes an audience with the queen and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh, or simply a "working trip" with meetings between Trump and May.

"That still hasn't been determined," Sanders told us in October, "We're still going back and forth with our allies there. And once we have those travel details outlined and determined, we'll certainly let you know."

Clearly, there are ominous signs of trouble if Trump is invited to a state visit. With more than 1.8 million British citizens signing a petition in January of this year to prevent the U.S. President from making a state visit, anti-Trump demonstrations are considered a sure thing.

Moreover, there are worries about matters of protocol.

Trump could want to meet with his closest friend in the United Kingdom who also happens to be that country’s most controversial political figure: Nigel Farage, former head of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) and father of the "Brexit" referendum that resulted in the UK now in the process of leaving the European Union (EU).

Following the Brexit vote last year, Farage came to the U.S. and in an unprecedented move for a British politician, joined Republican nominee Trump at a campaign rally. After the election, President-elect Trump suggested that the May government name Farage as ambassador to the U.S.— a highly unusual suggestion, since the British ambassador to the U.S. is almost always a career diplomat.

But, with the U.S. the biggest investor in the U.K., a Trump visit to London and a free trade deal with the U.K. are things that are critical to May and her government. The prime minister’s party lacks a majority in the House of Commons (parliament) and May herself is under fire from some within her own Cabinet — notably Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson — for not moving fast enough to execute Brexit.

As of Thanksgiving, all signs were that an invitation is indeed coming from London, but whether it is from Buckingham Palace or No. 10 Downing Street is still uncertain.

John Gizzi is chief political columnist and White House correspondent for Newsmax. For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

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As soon as Buckingham Palace makes the long-anticipated announcement that Prince Harry is engaged - either Sunday or Monday - the British government is expected to announce that President Trump will be invited to London in early 2018.
uk, london, trump, buckingham palace
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2017-56-25
Saturday, 25 November 2017 07:56 AM
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