Tags: Religion | greg abbott | texas | prayer breakfast | spine | injury

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Wows National Catholic Prayer Breakfast

Image: Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Wows National Catholic Prayer Breakfast
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Monday, 11 May 2015 06:43 AM Current | Bio | Archive

In what several at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast last Thursday dubbed one of the most unforgettable addresses in the group’s 11-year history, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott made a passionate call for prayer and the presence of God in everyday life.

"Prayers do work," declared Abbott, citing the New Testament (Romans 8:28) verse: "God works for the good of all those who love him."

The governor thereupon hushed the overflow crowd by recalling how, as a young lawyer, he was jogging and an oak tree fell on him. When his wife kissed him good-bye and went to work earlier that morning, he said, "It was the last time she would ever see me walk."

"Now I know what you’re thinking," the Texan told the silent crowd at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in Washington, D.C., "You’re thinking: 'How could this guy be jogging so slowly to be hit by a tree?'"—breaking the audience into laughter.

With his vertebrae crushed and spine severely injured, Abbott said, he and his wife "prayed so hard." Although he "would never get out of this wheelchair again," Abbott survived and went on to reach goals he might not have achieved had it not been for his accident, he said.

The Houston attorney was later elected to the Texas Supreme Court and as state attorney general. Last fall, he became the first person anywhere elected governor openly using a wheelchair. (Franklin Roosevelt hid his use of a wheelchair when he was elected governor of New York in 1928, and George Wallace was already governor of Alabama when an assassin’s bullet in 1972 forced him to use a wheelchair for the rest of his life).

Declaring that "religious liberty created America," Abbott warned that this liberty was under fire in America today. He recalled that, as attorney general of the Lone Star State, atheists filed a challenge to the presence of a monument bearing the Ten Commandments in the driveway of the State Capitol in Austin.

"It went all the way to the Supreme Court," said Abbott, "and we won."

He also pointed to legal challenges to the Lone Star State’s ban on tax dollars for partial birth abortions. Again, Abbott said, his office successfully defended the law all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

"Innocent lives were protected," said the governor, a convert to the Roman Catholic faith who makes no secret of his strong opposition to abortion.

In illustrating the assault on religious liberty, Abbott called on his audience to turn to God with prayer. Quoting Pope Francis, he said: "To not prayer is to close the door to God so he could do nothing to help."

In calling for prayer, Abbott closed his remarks with another verse from the New Testament (Matthew 19:26): "…with God, all things are possible."

John Gizzi is chief political columnist and White House correspondent for Newsmax.


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In what several at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast last Thursday dubbed one of the most unforgettable addresses in the group's 11-year history, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott made a passionate call for prayer and the presence of God in everyday life.
greg abbott, texas, prayer breakfast, spine, injury
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2015-43-11
Monday, 11 May 2015 06:43 AM
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