Tags: Coronavirus | coronavirus | emergencyfood

Lesson From Coronavirus Experience: Stock Up

Lesson From Coronavirus Experience: Stock Up

By Friday, 10 April 2020 09:15 AM Current | Bio | Archive

The coronavirus pandemic caught us, as both a species and a nation, with our pants down. It should not have. "Pandemic" is a word common to most. We've seen it in movies, read about it in fictional novels and have been ravaged by them multiple times in our history. 1918-1920 Spanish Influenza. Dark Ages Bubonic Plague. The H1N1 Swine Flu was only a decade ago!

Merely a few generations ago, before modern manufacturing and use of preservatives, our ancestors dried, smoked, canned and stored food. I know that short of a major worldwide disruption worse than this current one, with few exceptions, people will probably not be going back to those methods. However, we have an advantage over our long-gone relatives. We have modern food manufacturing technology-canned food, MREs, long-life dehydrated food, irradiation, etc. The question is, will people take advantage of it?

Many of us remember the television series "Doomsday Preppers." It was on the National Geographic network and featured people planning for worst-case scenarios. Many people watched it, but most were probably mocking those on the program. However, during the initial rush on grocery stores after the coronavirus outbreak in our country, those "crazy preppers" didn't seem so crazy after all.  

Why were so many unprepared? We've all seen the rush on grocery stores just before hurricanes make landfall. We remember the days after Katrina when so many had no food or basic supplies. What changed in humans to make us so complacent and comfortable about having empty cabinets or pantries a week after shopping?

The American Red Cross recommends having a 14-day food supply for your household and one gallon of water per person per day. This should be the minimum that you should consider. You don't have to make a giant purchase. With long-life, shelf stable food availability, you should just add an extra 10%-20% to your grocery purchases towards building an emergency provision for you and your family.

Keep any food or bottled water supply fresh by rotating it. There's a term that restaurants use-FIFO. It stands for FIRST IN, FIRST OUT. Use the oldest product first and replace it with a new one. You can store bottled water or gallons of water in a dark area and it will stay potable for at least 2 years. But if you drink some daily, a proper rotation will ensure that it's always fresh.

I am not saying to have a 30-day or 6-month supply. That is a decision that only you and your household can make for yourselves. I am merely reminding you that no one knows what will happen tomorrow. 2020 has taught us that. The possibilities are endless: earthquake, tornado, hurricane, virus, economic collapse. Be ready for the next event because that is the one thing I can guarantee: There will be a "next time."

John Cylc is a conservative Christian and eight year U.S. Army veteran who primarily speaks out on the Second Amendment, gun rights issues, and contemporary topics. Born and raised in Philadelphia, he currently resides with his wife and youngest son in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains in beautiful East Tennessee. He is the founder of ThirteenFox.com and a contributor to LifeZette. To read more of his reports — Click Here Now.

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During the initial rush on grocery stores after the coronavirus outbreak, those "crazy preppers" didn't seem so crazy after all.  
coronavirus, emergencyfood
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2020-15-10
Friday, 10 April 2020 09:15 AM
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