Tags: 2018 Midterm Elections | georgia | governor | kemp | abrams | runoff

Will Libertarian Force Georgia's Heated Governor's Race Into Historic Runoff?

Will Libertarian Force Georgia's Heated Governor's Race Into Historic Runoff?
Georgia gubernatorial candidates, from left, Democrat Stacey Abrams, Republican Brian Kemp, and Libertarian Ted Metz in a debate on Oct. 23. (John Bazemore-Pool/Getty Images)

By Monday, 29 October 2018 02:01 PM Current | Bio | Archive

With two weeks to go before Georgians elect a successor to termed-out Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, signs are growing ominous that the heated contest between Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp will be decided by a unique runoff—a month after the Nov. 6 election.

According to the latest NBC News/Marist poll, Secretary of State Kemp leads state legislator Abrams among likely voters by a wafer-thin 46 percent to 45 percent statewide, with Libertarian nominee Ted Metz drawing 4 percent, and 5 percent undecided.

Should those numbers hold and neither major party contender win a majority, Georgia’s unique general election law will kick in and Abrams and Kemp will meet in a runoff.

Under the Peach State law, should any candidates in the fall election fail to secure 50 percent of the vote plus one, the top two voter-getters are required to meet in a December runoff.

U.S. Senate races in 1992 and 2008 were decided by runoffs because a Libertarian drew enough votes to keep the major-party candidates from drawing an initial majority.

In recent weeks, Metz, 60, an insurance agent and U.S. Navy veteran, has earned swatches of publicity after he was included in a debate with Abrams and Kemp that was carried lived on Georgia Public Broadcasting. Decrying the harsh tone of his opponents (“they’re trying to pull us apart”), Metz made a strong pitch for industrial hemp, smaller government, and a “protest” vote against the “same ol’ stuff.”

Four years ago, Metz drew 3.43 percent—a stronger-than-average performance for Libertarians—as a candidate for state insurance commissioner.

“The most likely outcome is that Kemp wins straight up,” retired syndicated columnist and pollster Matt Towery told Newsmax, noting that 741,000 Georgians have so far voted early. Noting that Republican Sens. Paul Coverdell in 1992 and Saxby Chambliss in ’08 won runoffs convincingly, Towery pointed out “if Metz forces a runoff, the turnout from older voters who tend to vote Republican suggests Kemp would be the favorite.”

John Gizzi is chief political columnist and White House correspondent for Newsmax. For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

© 2020 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


   
1Like our page
2Share
John-Gizzi
With two weeks to go before Georgians elect a successor to termed-out Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, signs are growing ominous that the heated contest between Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp will be decided by a unique runoff-a month after the Nov. 6...
georgia, governor, kemp, abrams, runoff
347
2018-01-29
Monday, 29 October 2018 02:01 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved