Tags: Hollywood | Latin America | Media Bias | Mexico | Cancer | fox | hispanic

Entertainment Industry in Election Mind Control Mode

thought control as in no thoughts at all
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Monday, 05 August 2019 12:50 PM Current | Bio | Archive

That Hollywood would be walking hand-in-hand with the Democratic Party in an effort to shape the mindset of the culture-at-large is nothing new.

However, the idea that entertainment products would have morphed into super-sized mallets that would be used to hammer left-wing agendas into folks’ heads is.

The routine insertion into entertainment content by Hollywood of "woke" themes and characters is clearly illustrated in a highly altered supposed reboot of a previous 1990’s television show, "Party of Five."

The original "Party of Five" ran on Fox from 1994 to 2000.

It starred Neve Campbell, Scott Wolf, Matthew Fox, and Lacey Chabert.

The series dealt with the Salinger family’s five children, who were forced to fend for themselves after their parents were killed in an accident by a drunk driver.

Hollywood’s updated version, which airs on the Disney-owned cable network Freeform, has none of the original characters and is missing a majority of the themes present in the initial run of a "Party of Five."

The redesigned show features a Mexican family in which sibling children are forced into orphan-hood when their mom and dad are deported.

In reality, the series is not actually a reboot but rather a radical re-imagining employing one of the favorite memes of the left.

The original show’s setting was San Francisco. It had a run of six seasons and helped to launch the careers of its cast, including one particular guest star — Jennifer Love Hewitt.

Despite its having been on the air more than two decades ago, the original show features themes that to this day continue to resonate with viewers.

Even though the series was categorized as one designed to attract teens, the issues with which the Salinger family had to deal included a character’s battle with cancer, another's battle with alcoholism, a young woman who was a victim of domestic violence, and naturally the show’s primary focus of the children being minus parental figures.

Because the series had relatively low ratings in its first and second seasons, speculation at at the time suggested that it might not be renewed.

However, after it won the 1996 Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series in the drama category, its ratings and popularity grew for most of the remainder of the show.

Original creators Chris Keyser and Amy Lippman are spearheading the storytelling in the revised version, although the two showrunners have seen fit to abandon the original characters and plot line.

Lippman told The Associated Press (AP) that she and Keyser had turned down previous offers to bring the show back over concerns that they did not want to incorporate the same story line with new actors. But Lippman also indicated that the pair had changed their minds after reading front-page stories about children being separated from their parents.

"We have told this story before but it was imaginary," Lippman said. "Now it’s actually a story that is playing out all over the country."

"In the previous show, we didn’t need to be specific to a culture or a political climate," Lippman added. "This family is very concerned about [its] status."

Lippman noted that the show hired a mostly Latino writing staff.

A trailer was recently released spotlighting the deportation and immigration story line featuring five Hispanic children who struggle to survive following their parents’ deportation to Mexico.

The trailer shows the parents being separated from their children, opening with an inflammatory scene that shows the family patriarch being asked for his papers and being led out of a restaurant by government law enforcement.

Although the first episode’s airing has yet to be announced, reports indicate that it will hit the airwaves in late 2019, just in time for the pre-election mind-manipulation of the public.

James Hirsen, J.D., M.A., in media psychology, is a New York Times best-selling author, media analyst, and law professor. Visit Newsmax TV Hollywood. Read more reports from James Hirsen — Click Here Now.

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JamesHirsen
The routine insertion into entertainment content by Hollywood of "woke" themes and characters is clearly illustrated in a highly altered supposed reboot of a previous 1990’s television show, "Party of Five."
fox, hispanic, mexican, disney
653
2019-50-05
Monday, 05 August 2019 12:50 PM
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