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Changing Concepts in Medicine

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Monday, 01 Dec 2014 04:52 PM Current | Bio | Archive

When I entered medical school, the introductory lecture by the dean of the medical school explained to us that during the next four years we would have to learn a lot of information, but only half of it was right and the other half was wrong. It was our job to find out which half was right and which half was wrong.
 
Even after medical school, this has certainly been my experience in the field of medicine. 
 
For example, we now know, based on research from Johns Hopkins University, that the brain can regenerate itself — a thing that was thought impossible years ago. We are also seeing return to homeopathic medicine that makes use of natural products rather than man-made pharmaceuticals. 
 
Another example of changing concepts in medicine came in the form of an ad for the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in the November 16 issue of the New York Times Magazine. Entitled “Surgery, Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, or None of the Above,” the ad touted Sloan Kettering’s program of active surveillance for prostate cancer. 
 
But they did not mention that there are nutritional products that can significantly decrease prostate cancer. 
 
In the same issue, there is an article about a 68-year-old woman who was losing her vision. Her physician had checked her eyes and found them fine. An MRI brain scan was negative, ruling out brain pathology as the cause of her decreasing vision.
 
The doctor was aware that cancers in other parts of the body can interfere with vision. Workup with additional MR’s and PET/CT scans demonstrated a pancreatic cancer that had metastasized to the woman’s liver. With treatment, her vision returned. 
 
Yet another article in the same issue of the New York Times, this time in the paper section, concerns an electrical scalp device for deadliest brain tumors that can prolong survival. Data show that an electrical stimulation device can be used to treat glioblastoma multiforme, a fast-growing type of brain cancer.  
 
There is also data showing that nutritional treatment of glioblastoma multiforme can cause survival in spite of failure of more traditional treatments such as radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery. 
 
In my experience, hyperbaric oxygen can decrease brain gliomas, and hyperbaric oxygen used immediately before each radiation treatment for brain tumors can increase survival by 50 percent.
 
Another technique for treating brain cancers is radioactive phosphorous (P32). This has produced regression of nonresponding brain tumors. I have one patient whose glioblastoma multiforme was incompletely removed. But we had given her radioactive P32 prior to the operative procedure. Thirty years later, she is still free of brain tumor, with no further treatment.
 
For more information on the changing concepts of cancer treatment, see “How to Cure Almost any Cancer for $5.15 a Day” by Bill Henderson.
 
 
 

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Dr-Maxfield
When I entered medical school, the introductory lecture by the dean of the medical school explained to us that during the next four years we would have to learn a lot of information, but only half of it was right and the other half was wrong.
cancer, brain, hyperbaric oxygen, Sloan Kettering
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2014-52-01
Monday, 01 Dec 2014 04:52 PM
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