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Stress Depletes Vitamin C

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Wednesday, 07 Jan 2015 04:36 PM Current | Bio | Archive

As people age, most will develop progressive vitamin C deficiency. Elderly people with small hemorrhages just under the skin of their hands and forearms suffer from advanced deficiencies.
 
Most also are deficient in a number of flavonoids, which also play a part in strengthening blood vessels.
 
I have noticed that people who suffer from recurrent hemorrhoids are often vitamin C-deficient, and that supplementation with at least two grams twice a day significantly reduces episodes of this painful disorder.
 
Vitamin C should be taken between meals because of its ability to stimulate absorption of
iron. Too much iron overloading can increase the risk of a number of diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, and promotes bacterial and viral infections and brain degeneration.
 
On the other hand, people with iron deficiency anemia should take vitamin C with their meals in order to absorb as much iron as possible.
 
Stress rapidly depletes vitamin C from the body, especially if it is intense and prolonged. One of the highest concentrations of vitamin C in the body is in the adrenal glands, which play a central role in dealing with stress.
 
One of the most important effects of vitamin C is the role it plays in wound healing. It has been known for a very long time that vitamin C is essential for repairing injuries.
 
When I had surgical or trauma patients, I always put them on high doses of vitamin C. The stress of surgery or of injury causes a very rapid and severe loss of vitamin C levels. If you are scheduled for surgery, it is a good idea to supplement with two grams of vitamin C as magnesium or calcium ascorbate three times a day for at least a week before your surgery is to be performed.
 
Normally, I would say take the vitamin C between meals to reduce excess iron absorption, but if you are preparing for surgery you will want some extra iron.
 
Smoking cigarettes causes severe deficiencies of vitamin C. Studies have shown that it is difficult to raise the vitamin C levels in smokers unless a very high dose — at least 500 mg, three times a day — is taken. This explains the advanced skin aging in smokers and their high incidence of vascular disease.
 
Vitamin C plays a major role in protecting blood vessels both as an antioxidant and for collagen formation. This rapid loss of vitamin C in smokers may also help explain why they are so prone to cancer, as vitamin C is a major antioxidant.

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Dr-Blaylock
As people age, most will develop progressive vitamin C deficiency. Elderly people with small hemorrhages just under the skin of their hands and forearms suffer from advanced deficiencies.
vitamin C, stress, antioxidant, anemia, vascular
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2015-36-07
Wednesday, 07 Jan 2015 04:36 PM
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