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Technology Blunts Brain Function

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Tuesday, 01 Nov 2016 04:40 PM Current | Bio | Archive

In Medieval times, prior to the widespread availability of printing, scholars memorized extremely long tracts of material and were able to pass this information along to scribes who faithfully recorded it for posterity.

This is how we received many of our great documents and treatises of antiquity.

The practice of using memory was still being extensively utilized even into the mid-20th century.

But with the advent of newer technology, in particular the personal computer and the cell phone, we have come to rely less and less upon our memories and our analytical thinking in everyday life.

In fact, many people today often refer to their computers or cell phones as a being a “peripheral brain.”

A related phenomenon, multitasking, has also taken society by storm.

Together, these two modern innovations have reduced our ability to memorize material, to analyze what we learn, and to utilize critical thinking.

When, for example, we want to know how many feet are in a mile we just tap a few electronic buttons and the answer appears as if by magic.

We no longer sit quietly thinking about problems, we just call upon our electronic peripheral brains for an instant answer.

And we almost never think deeply about difficult subjects, for our minds are busy computing four or five other things at the same time.

To resist this modern malady we must use some discipline.

Every day, you should try to memorize long passages — poems, Bible verses, famous quotes, and other useful material.

Sit quietly in a room and think deeply about a subject, carefully and logically working out all the details in your mind.

You’ll be glad you did.
 

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Dr-Blaylock
With the advent of newer technology, in particular the personal computer and the cell phone, we have come to rely less and less upon our memories and our analytical thinking in everyday life.
technology, reading, learning, memory
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2016-40-01
Tuesday, 01 Nov 2016 04:40 PM
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