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Tags: Coronavirus | Coronavirus Special | Health Topics | Vaccines | Anxiety | Cold/Flu | johnson and johnson

CDC: Anxiety, Not J&J Vaccine, Caused Adverse Reactions

CDC: Anxiety, Not J&J Vaccine, Caused Adverse Reactions
(Scott Olson/Getty Images)

By    |   Friday, 30 April 2021 06:07 PM

Anxiety — not the Johnson & Johnson vaccine — caused adverse reactions, according to a report released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Five mass vaccination sites reported 64 anxiety-related events, including 17 events of syncope [fainting] after receipt of [the Johnson & Johnson] COVID-19 vaccine," the report stated.

Experts say anxiety-inducing physical reactions are nothing new and have been known for decades. Researchers state these types of reactions can occur after any vaccination.

Experts reported the incidents occurred April 7 through April 9 after the Food and Drug Administration issued its emergency authorization approval for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Reports of the adverse reactions came from clinics in California, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa and North Carolina.

"We knew we were going to see this," said Dr. Noni MacDonald, a Canadian researcher, according to NBC News.

Many of the 64 inoculated reported symptoms of dizziness or experienced spells of fainting. Some experienced nausea and vomiting; others had racing hearts or chest pain, but none got seriously ill.

The CDC reported close to a quarter had experienced similar symptoms with past vaccines. MacDonald said about 10-15% of adults are afraid of injections as well.

Upon reviewing reports of a group of 14 military reservists who received flu shots in 2009, one 23-year-old man reported progressive weakness in his arms and leg but recovered fully the next day, MacDonald said, "Everybody thinks this is [only] young teenage girls. Well, it isn't."

MacDonald disagrees with some doctors who consider the phenomenon mass hysteria.

"These people are not crazy," she said. "They experience actual physical responses to psychological stress."

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Anxiety, not the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, caused adverse reactions, according to a report released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
johnson and johnson, cdc, study, pause, vaccine hesitancy
267
2021-07-30
Friday, 30 April 2021 06:07 PM
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