Tags: urinary incontinence | magnesium supplements | bladder problems | chondroitin sulfate | proanthocyanidins

Simple Home Remedy for Female Incontinence

By    |   Wednesday, 26 March 2014 04:51 PM


If you suffer from urinary incontinence, you may be able to ease your symptoms by simply increasing your intake of magnesium. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study at Israel's Tel Aviv University found that 55 percent of women who took 350 milligrams of magnesium hydroxide twice a day for four weeks experienced a significant improvement in symptoms. Researchers believe magnesium provides relief by reducing bladder muscle spasms and permitting the bladder to completely empty.
 
 The problem of urinary incontinence is widespread: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that more than 13 million Americans suffer from the condition, which is the involuntary loss of urine usually caused by the urethra's inability to close tightly enough to hold urine in the bladder. According to WebMD, up to 50 percent of older women suffer from the problem.
 
Traditional medicine has treatments to address the condition, including surgery, which many women wish to avoid. Medications can also offer relief, but about 50 percent of women stop taking them because of side effects. Fortunately, there are effective remedies, such as the  magnesium supplements in the Tel Aviv study, that you can try in the privacy of your own home. Other non-invasive treatments include:
 
• Vitamin D. The "sunshine vitamin" may promote more than strong bones. A study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology found women who were deficient in vitamin D increased their risk of urinary incontinence by 170 percent. In the study, 82 percent of women were deficient. The researchers suggested that treatment with vitamin D supplements could reduce the risk of incontinence.
 
• Pumpkin seed extract. Native American Indians used pumpkin seed to treat urinary problems, and 21st century Japanese researchers have proved once again that folk remedies actually work. They found that pumpkin seed extract decreases urinary incontinence by 79 percent, and nighttime trips to the bathroom by 68 percent. The seeds work by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. One clinical trial found they increased maximum bladder capacity.
 
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• Gosha Jinki Gan (GJG). A blend of 10 medicinal herbs, Gosha Jinki Gan is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that's been used for hundreds of years. A 2008 study found women improved after a single dose, and a 2007 study found similar results. Animals studies show it increases bladder capacity and reduces bladder contractions.
 
• Chondroitin sulfate. According to the University of Maryland, one study showed that the dietary supplement chondroitin sulfate, often used to treat osteoarthritis, is as effective in treating  incontinence as the prescription drug Detrol. (Don't take chondroitin sulfate if you are allergic to shellfish.)
 
St. John's wort. Normally used to treat depression, St. John's wort eases contractions of the bladder. A 2004 Italian study published in the journal Urology found that St. John's wort increased bladder control in rats. Experts recommend a dosage of 300 milligrams up to three times daily.
 
• Cranberry. The same chemicals in cranberries called proanthocyanidins that prevent urinary infections may also be effective in fighting incontinence. A dosage of 300 to 400 milligrams daily of cranberry extract can relieve the symptoms, according to the University of Michigan Medical Center. However, cranberry juice may irritate the bladder in some people.
 
You can also increase your odds of beating urinary incontinence by:
 
• Losing weight. Belly fat puts pressure on your bladder and pelvic muscles, and losing weight can reduce risk by as much as 47 percent.
 
Cutting out coffee. Caffeine contributes to bladder irritation and can stimulate muscle contractions.
 
Quitting smoking. Nicotine irritates the bladder, and Greek researchers found that smokers were more likely to suffer incontinence.
 
• Doing Kegel exercises. Five minutes of Kegel exercises a day, which use the same muscles you use to stop urinary flow, can help make your pelvic muscles strong and defeat incontinence. For instructions on Kegel exercises, go here 

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If you suffer from urinary incontinence, you may be able to ease your symptoms by simply increasing your intake of magnesium. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study at Israel's Tel Aviv University found that 55 percent of women who took 350 milligrams of magnesium...
urinary incontinence,magnesium supplements,bladder problems,chondroitin sulfate,proanthocyanidins
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2014-51-26
Wednesday, 26 March 2014 04:51 PM
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