Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Find out what others are saying about Dr. Blaylock by clicking here.
In the past, it was thought that the reason for Africans’ low cancer rates was that they ate a much lower concentration of animal fats. But newer, better analysis has shown that it has nothing to do with the fat in meats. [Full Story]
In the past, it was thought that the reason for Africans’ low cancer rates was that they ate a much lower concentration of animal fats. But newer, better analysis has shown that it has nothing to do with the fat in meats. [Full Story]
A growing list of plant flavonoids and vitamins are being found to have antidepressant and antianxiety effects. [Full Story]
A number of studies suggest that the parts of the brain that are damaged in cases of Parkinson’s disease can be protected by taking berberine. [Full Story]
Beta-sitosterol, a plant sterol supplement used for treating prostate enlargement, has also been shown to lower cholesterol. [Full Story]
One of the earliest and most important pathological changes associated with atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), heart disease, hypertension, and strokes is endothelial dysfunction. [Full Story]
Studies have shown that many factors can significantly affect the concentrations of each of important compounds in berries. Ripening can have a significant effect. [Full Story]
Ginseng has been found to be useful in treating and prevention of a number of neurological disorders. For example, the ginsenosides found in high concentrations in American and Korean red ginseng reduced brain damage due to stroke in experimental animals. [Full Story]
Ginseng holds promise for combating Parkinson’s disease. Studies have shown that various forms of ginseng also have special properties that protect against Parkinson’s. [Full Story]
One particularly important aspect of all neurodegenerative diseases is progressive decline in energy production within affected neurons, mostly due to impaired mitochondria. [Full Story]

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