Doris Wild Helmering is a nationally known marriage and relationship counselor, weight loss expert, television and radio personality, and business management coach. She is author of nine books, 1,200 newspaper columns, six e-booklets, and has written for Reader’s Digest, Redbook, Self, and Scripps Howard News Service. She has been a guest on OPRAH, Good Morning America, and CNN. She received the Alumni Merit Award from St. Louis University for advancing the field of psychotherapy and the Woman of Achievement Award from Soroptimist International. She was awarded clinical status in the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the International Transactional Analysis Association.

You can visit her website at: www.doriswildhelmering.com .

A Passive Taker is a person who floats along in life with seemingly little purpose and few goals. He does not focus on what he wants, likes, or dislikes. [Full Story]
A Passive Taker is a person who floats along in life with seemingly little purpose and few goals. He does not focus on what he wants, likes, or dislikes. [Full Story]
The Corrector is a person whose main focus in life is to find the flaw and then point it out.Usually their advice is given with a lot of "shoulds" and "oughts." They also have a habit of wagging their pointer finger as they give you this advice. [Full Story]
The Passive-Aggressive does what he wants to do, when he wants to do it. He's often late, he procrastinates, he tells you he will do something and then he doesn't. [Full Story]
If you have an internal locus of control, you believe that your actions largely determine what happens to you. [Full Story]
My wife continually bad-mouths my parents who we hardly ever see and live 500 miles away. [Full Story]
It’s okay to be quiet and back off from your child when you’re ready to chew a nail because of his or her behavior. [Full Story]
A man told me in therapy the other day that he was bad because he was too good. He has a bad habit of doing too much in a relationship. [Full Story]
When you look your partner in the eye while you communicate, you are less likely to spark a negative discussion. [Full Story]
It’s fine to want to do your best and even to excel in certain areas, but to continually measure your self-worth by how much you get done and how well you do it can be self-destructive. [Full Story]

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