Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

High doses of vitamin D keep arteries more flexible, potentially warding off heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes, preliminary research suggests. [Full Story]
High doses of vitamin D keep arteries more flexible, potentially warding off heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes, preliminary research suggests. [Full Story]
The simplest way to screen for diabetes in people without symptoms is urinalysis. A glucose number below 100 is normal. Any glucose number over 100 is cause for concern. [Full Story]
Foods that are high in fiber benefit in two ways. First, they fill you up and keep you full; and second, they lower cholesterol. Soluble fiber is particularly beneficial. [Full Story]
Most people understand that one of the factors in blood pressure management is limiting salt intake. But it turns out that increasing your potassium level may yield similar results. [Full Story]
About 1 in 3 Americans , 75 million people , have high blood pressure, which increases the risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke, or developing kidney disease. [Full Story]
Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure. [Full Story]
It’s obvious that the sweet tastes in candy, soda, and cake come from sugar, but do you know the other foods in which sugar is hiding? [Full Story]
Sugar occurs naturally in all foods that contain carbohydrates, including fruits and vegetables, grains, and dairy. [Full Story]
In 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved new labeling that includes the amount of added sugar found in packaged and processed foods. [Full Story]

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