Tags: Heart Disease | magnesium | heart | reduce | risk | mitral | valve

Should Heart Patients Take Magnesium?

By    |   Tuesday, 26 May 2015 12:58 PM


Magnesium holds the promise of reducing the risk of heart disease and aiding in the treatment of certain heart ailments. Medical treatment for heart conditions is a priority, so heart patients should consult with their doctor about magnesium in the diet and taking supplements.

Magnesium is an essential mineral in the body that helps with growth and maintenance of bones, cells, nerves, muscles and organs. It assists other minerals and nutrients in a variety of the body’s functions and some 300 chemical reactions.

Research indicates magnesium chloride and magnesium oxide reduce high cholesterol levels, which increase the risk of heart disease, WebMD reports. Magnesium decreases LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol, which contributes to clogging the arteries. It also increases healthy HDL cholesterol, which gobbles up excess cholesterol in the blood and sends it to the liver for elimination.

ALERT: 4 Things You'll Feel Before a Heart Attack

Magnesium might also play a part in metabolic syndrome, the increased risk for heart disease and diabetes. Low magnesium levels increase the likelihood of metabolic syndrome by up to seven times, according to WebMD. Women and young adults with a higher intake of magnesium through foods and supplements have a lower risk of developing the syndrome and heart disease.

People with heart valve disorders such as mitral valve prolapse might have low magnesium levels. Magnesium appears to reduce symptoms of the disorder for these patients.

Magnesium supplementation has been used to treat hospital patients with issues related to the heart. Intravenous delivery of magnesium helps to prevent blood vessel spasms for people with chest pain from angina. High blood pressure has been reduced for pregnant women who receive magnesium intravenously.

URGENT: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here.

Although research is continuing, some evidence suggests people with high levels of magnesium are less likely to experience sudden cardiac death.

Several long-term studies have linked high levels of magnesium to lower risks of heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements. Taking extra doses of magnesium may also prevent stroke, it was reported in a review of seven studies in the February 2012 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Extremely low levels of magnesium can cause symptoms such as numbness, tingling, nausea, fatigue, muscle contractions, abnormal heart rhythm, and seizures.

To get magnesium through diet, choose whole grains, dark green vegetables, legumes, fish, meat, nuts, seeds, and dairy products. When considering getting extra magnesium doses through supplements, heart patients should check with their doctor for proper intake. Higher levels of magnesium from supplements could interact with medications.

ALERT: 4 Things You'll Feel Before a Heart Attack

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Magnesium holds the promise of reducing the risk of heart disease and aiding in the treatment of certain heart ailments. Medical treatment for heart conditions is a priority, so heart patients should consult with their doctor about magnesium in the diet and taking...
magnesium, heart, reduce, risk, mitral, valve, prolapse
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2015-58-26
Tuesday, 26 May 2015 12:58 PM
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