Tags: heat | processed | food | obese

Heat-processed Food Promotes Weight Gain

Wednesday, 22 Aug 2012 11:51 AM


A common byproduct of heat-processed food, consumed by most Americans, may be a key culprit in the nation’s obesity epidemic – increasing the risk of weight gain and diabetes, a new study suggests.
Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found the compound – methyl-glyoxal (MG) – appears to play a significant role in the development of abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes.
Investigators said the discovery, which is based on laboratory studies of mice, could lead to new strategies for curbing worldwide obesity epidemic.
"The study demonstrates how the prolonged ingestion of seemingly innocuous substances common in human food, such as MG, can reduce defenses and compromise native resistance to metabolic and other diseases," said Dr. Helen Vlassara, who led the study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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"The mouse findings are also quite exciting because they provide us with new tools, not only to study, but to begin taking measures to prevent diabetes, either by suppressing their formation or by blocking their absorption with our food."
Vlassara and her colleagues found that mice exposed to MG for extended periods of time developed significant abdominal weight gain, early insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. MG is produced when food is cooked with dry heat – a common technique in processed foods. MG may lower the body's protective mechanisms that control inflammation.
Although the research involved mice, Vlassara said the findings have significant implications for people because MG acts in a similar way in the human body.
"These key findings should inform how we understand and prevent the human epidemic of obesity and diabetes," she said.
Researchers said the findings suggest clinical guidelines be revised to limit process foods and those cooked using dry heat – such as high-heat grilling – and replace them with methods that use lower heat or lots of moisture, such as stewing, poaching or steaming.
"Thus far, our findings reflect the need for a dramatic departure from standard clinical recommendations, which should now include a reduction in the amount of dry heat and processed foods in the diet," Vlassara said.
SPECIAL: These 5 Things Flush 40 lbs. of Fat Out of Your Body — Read More.



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A common byproduct of heat-processed food may be a key culprit in the nation’s obesity epidemic.
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2012-51-22
Wednesday, 22 Aug 2012 11:51 AM
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