Tags: Excessive TV Promotes Antisocial Behavior

Excessive TV Promotes Antisocial Behavior: Study

By    |   Tuesday, 19 Feb 2013 05:25 PM

Watching too much TV can increase the odds of antisocial and even criminal behavior, according to a new study out of New Zealand.

Researchers who tracked about 1,000 children born in the Dunedin in 1972-73 — between the ages of 5 and 15 years — found those who watched more television were more likely to have a criminal conviction in adulthood that could not be explained by socioeconomic or parenting factors.
 
The study, published online in the journal Pediatrics, also found watching a lot of television in childhood was associated, in adulthood, with aggressive personality traits, negative emotions, and an increased risk of antisocial personality disorder.
 
Bob Hancox, an associate professor with the University of Otago Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, said his team’s research found that the risk of having a criminal conviction by early adulthood increased by about 30 percent with every hour that children spent watching TV on an average weeknight.
 
"While we're not saying that television causes all antisocial behavior, our findings do suggest that reducing TV viewing could go some way towards reducing rates of antisocial behavior in society," said Hancox.
 
Other studies have suggested a link between television viewing and antisocial behavior, but few have demonstrated a cause-and-effect connection.
 
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children watch no more than two hours of quality television programming each day. The researchers said their findings support limiting children's television use.

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Watching too much TV can increase the odds of antisocial and even criminal behavior, according to a new study out of New Zealand.
Excessive TV Promotes Antisocial Behavior
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2013-25-19
Tuesday, 19 Feb 2013 05:25 PM
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