Tags: cancer | survivor | marriage

Can Marriage Boost Longevity?

Wednesday, 12 Sep 2012 02:26 PM


Married lung cancer patients survive longer than single patients after treatment, new research shows.
University of Maryland researchers identified the link between supportive spouses and improved survival odds by tracking 168 patients who were treated with chemotherapy and radiation over a 10-year-period, from January 2000 and December 2010.
They found that 33 percent of married patients were still alive after three years compared to 10 percent of the single patients. What’s more, women fared better than men: 46 percent of married women had at least a three-year survival rate, compared to just 3 percent of single men.
Single women and married men had the same 25 survival rate at three years, while white married patients had a better survival rate than married African-Americans.
The findings, presented at a meeting of the Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology, are the latest to show the profound health benefits of social support for cancer patients.
SPECIAL: This Small Group of Doctors are Quietly Curing Cancer — Read More.
"Marital status appears to be an important independent predictor of survival in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Elizabeth Nichols, a radiation oncologist resident at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center. "The reason for this is unclear, but our findings suggest the importance of social support in managing and treating our lung cancer patients. Patients may need help with day-to-day activities, getting to treatment and making sure they receive proper follow-up care."
Co-researcher Dr. Steven J. Feigenberg, said researchers now plan to look more deeply at how and why marriage benefits cancer patients and boosts longevity.
"We need to better understand why marriage is a factor in our patients' survival," said Feigenberg. "We're also trying to determine if these findings can be corroborated in the multi-institutional setting,"
Past studies have found decreased survival for single men diagnosed with several types of cancer, including prostate and head-and-neck cancers. A study of 440,000 Norwegian men and women, published last year, found that men who never married were 35 percent more likely to die from 13 common cancers than married men.
SPECIAL: This Small Group of Doctors are Quietly Curing Cancer — Read More.



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Married lung cancer patients survive longer than single patients after treatment, a new study finds.
cancer,survivor,marriage
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2012-26-12
Wednesday, 12 Sep 2012 02:26 PM
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