Tags: Heart Disease | blood | thinners | clotting | anti-coagulants

Precautions People on Blood Thinners Should Take

By    |   Thursday, 21 May 2015 01:22 PM



Switching to an electric razor to reduce your risk of cutting yourself is among various precautions suggested for people taking blood thinners, which are medications that work to prevent or slow down the formation of blood clots. Anti-coagulant blood thinners are prescribed for people with atrial fibrillation as well as those at risk for deep vein thrombosis, heart attack or stroke, according to intentionalcaregiver.com.

But blood thinners must be used carefully because blood clotting is an important physiological safety system that protects us after injuries, the website said. It indicated physicians, patients and caregivers must work together to achieve the right balance between preventing harmful blood clots and permitting beneficial clotting after cuts or other injuries. Here are some precautions people on blood thinners should take.

URGENT: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here.


1. Take blood thinners exactly as directed and make sure your physician and pharmacist know what other drugs you are taking, as some medications may cause an adverse reaction when taken with blood thinners, according to intentionalcaregiver.com. Some patients may need help remembering to take their medications on schedule.


2. Don’t take any other drugs, vitamins, cold medicines or herbal remedies without consulting your physician first, said internationalcaregiver.com. Aspirin in particular must not be used without a physician’s advice because it is an anti-platelet drug and may inhibit blood clotting beyond what’s actually good for the patient, according to intentionalcaregiver.com.


3. Make sure your physician is checking your progress at regular intervals to ensure your medication is working properly, according to mayoclinic.org.

ALERT: 4 Things You'll Feel Before a Heart Attack


4. Seek to avoid bleeding by keeping contact sports and any other activities that might cause cuts or scrapes to a minimum. Follow every possible precaution to reduce the risk of falls. Consider taking such steps such as using an electric shaver to avoid razor nicks or switching to a soft toothbrush to go easy on the gums and reduce the risk of bleeding, said intentionalcaregiver.com. Also, let your dentist know you are on a blood thinner before any dental work, even routine cleanings.


5. Check with your physician if you start to have diarrhea, fever, or any signs of infection, according to mayoclinic.org. Also check with your physician if you notice any unusual bleeding or bruising; blood in the urine or stools; or pinpoint red spots on your skin.


6. Let your healthcare provider know if you develop a "purple toe,” according to heart.emedtv.com. This is a potentially serious problem that can lead to toe amputation.


7. Keep in mind that geriatric massage, which is sometimes used to improve circulation and increase joint mobility in the elderly, is not recommended for patients taking blood thinners, says intentionalcaregiver.com, because of the risk of damaging delicate blood vessels and causing bleeding.


8. Keep in mind that the consumption of Vitamin K -- which is found in leafy green vegetables such as lettuce, spinach and Brussel sprouts – can inhibit therapy for patients who use the blood thinner Warfarin, according to intentionalcaregiver.com.

URGENT: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here.


Related Articles:

New Blood Thinner has Better Survival Rate Than Heparin

Blood Thinners: Uses and Side Effects


© 2017 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Health-Wire
Switching to an electric razor to reduce your risk of cutting yourself is among various precautions suggested for people taking blood thinners, which are medications that work to prevent or slow down the formation of blood clots. Anti-coagulant blood thinners are prescribed...
blood, thinners, clotting, anti-coagulants
535
2015-22-21
Thursday, 21 May 2015 01:22 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved