Tags: pandemic | psychology | stress | positivity

Staying Positive During Difficult Times

woman meditating during a sunset
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Monday, 19 October 2020 10:59 AM

This is one of the most challenging times we have faced in recent history. The pandemic, economic woes, and political strife have ravaged the country, causing anxiety and stress among Americans.

But according to Julie Corliss, the executive editor of the Harvard Heart Letter, “when people look back on their lives, it is usually the most difficult challenges that gave them a new perspective or caused them to grow the most.”

Applying positive psychology can help us reshape many of these negative feelings.

“Positive psychology is not about denying difficult emotions. It’s about opening to what is happening here and now, and cultivating and savoring the good in your life,” said Dr. Ron Siegel, assistant professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School.

Here are some tips:

  • Practice mindfulness. Siegel said that focusing your attention on the present moment is essential when the future is uncertain. Stress reduction programs based on mindfulness training have helped people overcome the psychological and physical symptoms of anxiety. He has free guided recordings of helpful meditations on his website.
  • Try possibility thinking. Dr. Heidi Hanna, founder of the Stress Mastery Academy, tells Newsmax she has been trying to get unstuck from all the negative aspects of the world around us and looking for ways she can learn and grow from the experience. “I ask myself if there is a possibility I might learn something or grow stronger as a result. Being able to rest in the possibility of positive outcomes alleviates the pressure of stress so I can take positive action,” she says.
  • Be kind. Kindness DOES matter, say experts at Harvard Medical School who point to research that shows those who volunteer their time tend to be happier than those who do not.
  • Practice gratitude. Robert Emmons, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at the University of California, Davis, has often been called the “guru of gratitude.” He has conducted numerous studies that show people who practice gratitude consistently have higher levels of positive emotions, are more alert, alive, and awake, and enjoy more joy and pleasure in life. Experts recommend keeping a gratitude journal and writing down daily things you are thankful for.

“Instead of looking broadly for what might be positive in your life right now, consider taking small steps by getting very specific and good questions and practical tools,” says Hanna. “For example, how can I add positivity to this email right now? How can I be helpful to someone else?”

© 2020 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


   
1Like our page
2Share
Health-News
This is one of the most challenging times we have faced in recent history. The pandemic, economic woes, and political strife have ravaged the country, causing anxiety and stress among Americans. But according to Julie Corliss, the executive editor of the Harvard Heart...
pandemic, psychology, stress, positivity
412
2020-59-19
Monday, 19 October 2020 10:59 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 
Newsmax TV Live

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved